Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Book Chapter: not found
      Epstein Barr Virus Volume 1: One Herpes Virus: Many Diseases 

      The Role of EBV in the Pathogenesis of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

      ,

      Springer International Publishing

      Read this book at

      Buy book Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this book yet. Authors can add summaries to their books on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 108

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found

          Global cancer statistics.

          The global burden of cancer continues to increase largely because of the aging and growth of the world population alongside an increasing adoption of cancer-causing behaviors, particularly smoking, in economically developing countries. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2008 estimates, about 12.7 million cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths are estimated to have occurred in 2008; of these, 56% of the cases and 64% of the deaths occurred in the economically developing world. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females, accounting for 23% of the total cancer cases and 14% of the cancer deaths. Lung cancer is the leading cancer site in males, comprising 17% of the total new cancer cases and 23% of the total cancer deaths. Breast cancer is now also the leading cause of cancer death among females in economically developing countries, a shift from the previous decade during which the most common cause of cancer death was cervical cancer. Further, the mortality burden for lung cancer among females in developing countries is as high as the burden for cervical cancer, with each accounting for 11% of the total female cancer deaths. Although overall cancer incidence rates in the developing world are half those seen in the developed world in both sexes, the overall cancer mortality rates are generally similar. Cancer survival tends to be poorer in developing countries, most likely because of a combination of a late stage at diagnosis and limited access to timely and standard treatment. A substantial proportion of the worldwide burden of cancer could be prevented through the application of existing cancer control knowledge and by implementing programs for tobacco control, vaccination (for liver and cervical cancers), and early detection and treatment, as well as public health campaigns promoting physical activity and a healthier dietary intake. Clinicians, public health professionals, and policy makers can play an active role in accelerating the application of such interventions globally.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Distinct types of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma identified by gene expression profiling.

            Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is clinically heterogeneous: 40% of patients respond well to current therapy and have prolonged survival, whereas the remainder succumb to the disease. We proposed that this variability in natural history reflects unrecognized molecular heterogeneity in the tumours. Using DNA microarrays, we have conducted a systematic characterization of gene expression in B-cell malignancies. Here we show that there is diversity in gene expression among the tumours of DLBCL patients, apparently reflecting the variation in tumour proliferation rate, host response and differentiation state of the tumour. We identified two molecularly distinct forms of DLBCL which had gene expression patterns indicative of different stages of B-cell differentiation. One type expressed genes characteristic of germinal centre B cells ('germinal centre B-like DLBCL'); the second type expressed genes normally induced during in vitro activation of peripheral blood B cells ('activated B-like DLBCL'). Patients with germinal centre B-like DLBCL had a significantly better overall survival than those with activated B-like DLBCL. The molecular classification of tumours on the basis of gene expression can thus identify previously undetected and clinically significant subtypes of cancer.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Confirmation of the molecular classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray.

              Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be divided into prognostically important subgroups with germinal center B-cell-like (GCB), activated B-cell-like (ABC), and type 3 gene expression profiles using a cDNA microarray. Tissue microarray (TMA) blocks were created from 152 cases of DLBCL, 142 of which had been successfully evaluated by cDNA microarray (75 GCB, 41 ABC, and 26 type 3). Sections were stained with antibodies to CD10, bcl-6, MUM1, FOXP1, cyclin D2, and bcl-2. Expression of bcl-6 (P <.001) or CD10 (P =.019) was associated with better overall survival (OS), whereas expression of MUM1 (P =.009) or cyclin D2 (P <.001) was associated with worse OS. Cases were subclassified using CD10, bcl-6, and MUM1 expression, and 64 cases (42%) were considered GCB and 88 cases (58%) non-GCB. The 5-year OS for the GCB group was 76% compared with only 34% for the non-GCB group (P <.001), which is similar to that reported using the cDNA microarray. Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 were adverse predictors in the non-GCB group. In multivariate analysis, a high International Prognostic Index score (3-5) and the non-GCB phenotype were independent adverse predictors (P <.0001). In summary, immunostains can be used to determine the GCB and non-GCB subtypes of DLBCL and predict survival similar to the cDNA microarray.
                Bookmark

                Author and book information

                Book
                978-3-319-22821-1
                978-3-319-22822-8
                2015
                10.1007/978-3-319-22822-8
                Book Chapter
                2015
                October 1 2015
                : 315-337
                10.1007/978-3-319-22822-8_13

                Comments

                Comment on this book

                Book chapters

                Similar content 3,417

                Cited by 6