10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Book Chapter: not found
      Land Tenure Security and Sustainable Development 

      Interaction of Conditional Incentives for Ecosystem Conservation with Tenure Security: Multiple Roles for Tenure Interventions

      other
      ,
      Springer International Publishing

      Read this book at

      Publisher
      Buy book Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this book yet. Authors can add summaries to their books on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This chapter examines the role of tenure in conditional incentives for ecosystem conservation, often known as PES or payment for ecosystem services. PES systems that mimic market exchange require that resource tenure be clear and uncontested. In practice, there are different levels of conditionality in PES and different types of tenure challenges. REDD+, or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, was initially conceived as a PES system embedded in a global exchange of carbon credits, thus requiring secure forest tenure. We examine one global initiative to achieve that, the Dedicated Grant Mechanism for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities. Cases in Peru and Indonesia illustrate how tenure interventions can both enable implementation of conditional incentives and become part of those incentives.

          Related collections

          Most cited references57

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Inhibition of Amazon deforestation and fire by parks and indigenous lands.

          Conservation scientists generally agree that many types of protected areas will be needed to protect tropical forests. But little is known of the comparative performance of inhabited and uninhabited reserves in slowing the most extreme form of forest disturbance: conversion to agriculture. We used satellite-based maps of land cover and fire occurrence in the Brazilian Amazon to compare the performance of large (> 10,000 ha) uninhabited (parks) and inhabited (indigenous lands, extractive reserves, and national forests) reserves. Reserves significantly reduced both deforestation and fire. Deforestation was 1.7 (extractive reserves) to 20 (parks) times higher along the outside versus the inside of the reserve perimeters and fire occurrence was 4 (indigenous lands) to 9 (national forests) times higher. No strong difference in the inhibition of deforestation (p = 0. 11) or fire (p = 0.34) was found between parks and indigenous lands. However, uninhabited reserves tended to be located away from areas of high deforestation and burning rates. In contrast, indigenous lands were often created in response to frontier expansion, and many prevented deforestation completely despite high rates of deforestation along their boundaries. The inhibitory effect of indigenous lands on deforestation was strong after centuries of contact with the national society and was not correlated with indigenous population density. Indigenous lands occupy one-fifth of the Brazilian Amazon-five times the area under protection in parks--and are currently the most important barrier to Amazon deforestation. As the protected-area network expands from 36% to 41% of the Brazilian Amazon over the coming years, the greatest challenge will be successful reserve implementation in high-risk areas of frontier expansion as indigenous lands are strengthened. This success will depend on a broad base of political support.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Taking stock: A comparative analysis of payments for environmental services programs in developed and developing countries

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Ecology. Direct payments to conserve biodiversity.

                Bookmark

                Author and book information

                Book Chapter
                2022
                July 15 2022
                : 201-223
                10.1007/978-3-030-81881-4_10
                68bdea09-3c60-480d-ab93-48fbf97293ad
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this book

                Book chapters

                Similar content205