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      Scientific Researches in Health Sciences II 

      Comparison of the Public’s Social Distance toward Syrian Refugees and Perceptions of Access to Healthcare Services: İstanbul Sample

      , ,
      Peter Lang
      Refugee, Social Distance, Health Services

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          Abstract

          Objective: This study was planned with the aim of comparing social distance of society towards Syrian refugees with perceptions about access to health care services. Materials and Methods: The descriptively planned research was completed with 2426 individuals attending hospital at least once themselves or with first degree relatives who received nursing care living in counties in İstanbul from 1 January - 15 March 2017 and who agreed to participate in the research. Data collection tools used the information form containing information about patient and relative ages, sex, and educational level, Bogardus Social Distance Scale (SDS) and healthcare services access perception survey. Data obtained in the research were analyzed using the SPSS program. Appropriate tests were used based on the distribution of data. Results: Mean age of participants was 36.1±11.4 years, with the majority of individuals in Generation Y, 55.9 % were female, 44.7 % were high school graduates, 37.9 % resided in İstanbul 2nd region and 69.7 % had moderate income levels. Among participants, 25.3 % stated they or a first degree relative had chronic disease, while 74.8 % were satisfied with service in the health facility they attended. Additionally, 68.8 % of participants waited mean 42.09±38.46 minutes before examinations or tests. Total mean points obtained from the SDS were identified as 65.28±26.11. When the status of living in the same street as Syrian refugees, risk in terms of security of this situation, and effect of presence of refugees on level of health service received and time allocated to them by health personnel are compared with mean SDS of participants, statistically significant differences were identified (p<0.05). Conclusion: Most participants had moderate social distance to refugees and thought that the presence of refugees delayed their access to health services and lowered the level of health services.

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          Universal health coverage in Turkey: enhancement of equity.

          Turkey has successfully introduced health system changes and provided its citizens with the right to health to achieve universal health coverage, which helped to address inequities in financing, health service access, and health outcomes. We trace the trajectory of health system reforms in Turkey, with a particular emphasis on 2003-13, which coincides with the Health Transformation Program (HTP). The HTP rapidly expanded health insurance coverage and access to health-care services for all citizens, especially the poorest population groups, to achieve universal health coverage. We analyse the contextual drivers that shaped the transformations in the health system, explore the design and implementation of the HTP, identify the factors that enabled its success, and investigate its effects. Our findings suggest that the HTP was instrumental in achieving universal health coverage to enhance equity substantially, and led to quantifiable and beneficial effects on all health system goals, with an improved level and distribution of health, greater fairness in financing with better financial protection, and notably increased user satisfaction. After the HTP, five health insurance schemes were consolidated to create a unified General Health Insurance scheme with harmonised and expanded benefits. Insurance coverage for the poorest population groups in Turkey increased from 2·4 million people in 2003, to 10·2 million in 2011. Health service access increased across the country-in particular, access and use of key maternal and child health services improved to help to greatly reduce the maternal mortality ratio, and under-5, infant, and neonatal mortality, especially in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Several factors helped to achieve universal health coverage and improve outcomes. These factors include economic growth, political stability, a comprehensive transformation strategy led by a transformation team, rapid policy translation, flexible implementation with continuous learning, and simultaneous improvements in the health system, on both the demand side (increased health insurance coverage, expanded benefits, and reduced cost-sharing) and the supply side (expansion of infrastructure, health human resources, and health services). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            The Syrian refugee crisis: Regional and human security implications

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              The international migration and foreign policy nexus: the case of Syrian refugee crisis and Turkey

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                : 213
                10.3726/9783631848357.003.0013
                d0f23090-e0f4-451f-bfe3-c63bee9f2bc6
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