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      Ticks of Europe and North Africa 

      Genus Ixodes Latreille, 1795

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      Springer International Publishing

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          Most cited references 32

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          The Argasidae, Ixodidae and Nuttalliellidae (Acari: Ixodida) of the world: a list of valid species names

          This work is intended as a consensus list of valid tick names, following recent revisionary studies, wherein we recognize 896 species of ticks in 3 families. The Nuttalliellidae is monotypic, containing the single entity Nuttalliella namaqua. The Argasidae consists of 193 species, but there is widespread disagreement concerning the genera in this family, and fully 133 argasids will have to be further studied before any consensus can be reached on the issue of genus-level classification. The Ixodidae comprises 702 species in 14 genera: Amblyomma (130 species, of which 17 were formerly included in Aponomma, a genus that is still considered valid by some authors), Anomalohimalaya (3), Bothriocroton (7, all previously included in Aponomma), Cosmiomma (1), Cornupalpatum (1), Compluriscutula (1), Dermacentor (34, including the single member of the former genus Anocentor, which is still considered valid by some authors), Haemaphysalis (166), Hyalomma (27), Ixodes (243), Margaropus (3), Nosomma (2), Rhipicentor (2) and Rhipicephalus (82, including 5 species from the former genus Boophilus, which is still considered valid by some authors). We regard six names as invalid: Amblyomma laticaudae Warburton, 1933 is a synonym of Amblyomma nitidum Hirst & Hirst, 1910; Bothriocroton decorosum (Koch, 1867) is a synonym of B. undatum (Fabricius, 1775); Haemaphysalis vietnamensis Hoogstraal & Wilson, 1966 is a synonym of H. colasbelcouri (Santos Dias, 1958); Haemaphysalis xinjiangensis Teng, 1980 is a synonym of H. danieli Č erný & Hoogstraal, 1977; Hyalomma erythraeum Tonelli-Rondelli, 1932 is a synonym of H. impeltatum Schulze and Schlottke, 1930 and Rhipicephalus hoogstraali Kolonin, 2009 was not described according to the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.
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            Host-dependent genetic structure of parasite populations: differential dispersal of seabird tick host races.

            Despite the fact that parasite dispersal is likely to be one of the most important processes influencing the dynamics and coevolution of host-parasite interactions, little information is available on the factors that affect it. In most cases, opportunities for parasite dispersal should be closely linked to host biology. Here we use microsatellite genetic markers to compare the population structure and dispersal of two host races of the seabird tick Ixodes uriae at the scale of the North Atlantic. Interestingly, tick populations showed high within-population genetic variation and relatively low population differentiation. However, gene flow at different spatial scales seemed to depend on the host species exploited. The black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) had structured tick populations showing patterns of isolation by distance, whereas tick populations of the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica) were only weakly structured at the largest scale considered. Host-dependent rates of tick dispersal between colonies will alter infestation probabilities and local dynamics and may thus modify the adaptation potential of ticks to local hosts. Moreover, as I. uriae is a vector of the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in both hemispheres, the large-scale movements of birds and the subsequent dispersal of ticks will have important consequences for the dynamics and coevolutionary interactions of this microparasite with its different vertebrate and invertebrate hosts.
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              The hard-tick fauna of mainland Portugal (Acari: Ixodidae): an update on geographical distribution and known associations with hosts and pathogens.

              This work is an updated revision of the available information on Portuguese ixodid tick species. It includes data on tick biology, ecology, taxonomy and host/pathogen-associations. The current list of Portuguese ixodid ticks comprises twenty species: Dermacentor marginatus (Sulzer, 1776), Dermacentor reticulatus (Fabricius, 1794), Haemaphysalis hispanica Gil Collado, 1938, Haemaphysalis inermis Birula, 1895, Haemaphysalis punctata Canestrini & Fanzago, 1878, Hyalomma lusitanicum Koch, 1844, Hyalomma marginatum Koch, 1844, Ixodes acuminatus Neumann, 1901, Ixodes bivari Dias, 1990, Ixodes canisuga Johnston, 1849, Ixodes frontalis (Panzer, 1798), Ixodes hexagonus Leach, 1815, Ixodes ricinus (Linnaeus, 1758), Ixodes simplex Neumann, 1906, Ixodes ventalloi Gil Collado, 1936, Ixodes vespertilionis Koch, 1844, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus (Say, 1821), Rhipicephalus bursa Canestrini & Fanzago, 1878, Rhipicephalus pusillus Gil Collado, 1938, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806).
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                Author and book information

                Book
                978-3-319-63759-4
                978-3-319-63760-0
                2017
                10.1007/978-3-319-63760-0
                Book Chapter
                2017
                March 16 2018
                : 79-90
                10.1007/978-3-319-63760-0_18

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