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      Towards a New Humanity : The Uriage Manifesto, 1945 

      The New Man and Institutions

      Peter Lang

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          Abstract

          We could not speak without trickery about a new man in abstracting him from the context in which he is brought to life and to self-development. If we insist on the pedagogy of the new man, this is, firstly, because, for us, man is at the same time the motor and the end of all revolution, and, secondly, because this is our vocation, this is what we want to be our proper task. But a new type of man cannot become widespread without new institutions. If, in fact, man founds and animates institutions, they, in return, contribute to forming men. They are, said Plato, their ‘nursemaids’. In these conditions, to aspire to create a new man in a modern society, as did the first Christians and the men of the Renaissance and the Reformation, would be to postpone the fulfilment of our task for several centuries. The rhythm of History has become too rapid in the twentieth century for factors of speed and mass not to be taken into account. The speed of social evolution has become such in this period of crisis that every attempt to reform man restricted only to spiritual and pedagogical means would be constantly left behind.

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          10.3726/9781789974836.003.0014
          e021ec7f-58b4-4653-9b30-427a0b3f7b2a
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