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      Progenitor Cells 

      Droplet Digital PCR for Measuring Absolute Copies of Gene Transcripts in Human Islet-Derived Progenitor Cells

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          Most cited references 19

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          Epigenetic memory and preferential lineage-specific differentiation in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human pancreatic islet beta cells.

          Human induced pluripotent stem cells (HiPSCs) appear to be highly similar to human embryonic stem cells (HESCs). Using two genetic lineage-tracing systems, we demonstrate the generation of iPSC lines from human pancreatic islet beta cells. These reprogrammed cells acquired markers of pluripotent cells and differentiated into the three embryonic germ layers. However, the beta cell-derived iPSCs (BiPSCs) maintained open chromatin structure at key beta-cell genes, together with a unique DNA methylation signature that distinguishes them from other PSCs. BiPSCs also demonstrated an increased ability to differentiate into insulin-producing cells both in vitro and in vivo, compared with ESCs and isogenic non-beta iPSCs. Our results suggest that the epigenetic memory may predispose BiPSCs to differentiate more readily into insulin producing cells. These findings demonstrate that HiPSC phenotype may be influenced by their cells of origin, and suggest that their skewed differentiation potential may be advantageous for cell replacement therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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            Evaluation of digital PCR for absolute DNA quantification.

            The emerging technique of microfluidic digital PCR (dPCR) offers a unique approach to real-time quantitative PCR for measuring nucleic acids that may be particularly suited for low-level detection. In this study, we evaluated the quantitative capabilities of dPCR when measuring small amounts (<200 copies) of DNA and investigated parameters influencing technical performance. We used various DNA templates, matrixes, and assays to evaluate the precision, sensitivity and reproducibility of dPCR, and demonstrate that this technique can be highly reproducible when performed at different times and when different primer sets are targeting the same molecule. dPCR exhibited good analytical sensitivity and was reproducible outside the range recommended by the instrument manufacturer; detecting 16 estimated targets with high precision. The inclusion of carrier had no effect on this estimated quantity, but did improve measurement precision. We report disagreement when using dPCR to measure different template types and when comparing the estimated quantities by dPCR and UV spectrophotometry. Finally, we also demonstrate that preamplification can impose a significant measurement bias. These findings provide an independent assessment of low copy molecular measurement using dPCR and underline important factors for consideration in dPCR experimental design.
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              Tolerance of droplet-digital PCR vs real-time quantitative PCR to inhibitory substances.

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                Author and book information

                Book
                978-1-4939-9630-8
                978-1-4939-9631-5
                2019
                10.1007/978-1-4939-9631-5
                Book Chapter
                2019
                July 05 2019
                : 37-48
                10.1007/978-1-4939-9631-5_4

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