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      BP 897, a Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Ligand with Therapeutic Potential for the Treatment of Cocaine-Addiction

      CNS drug reviews
      Wiley

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          Most cited references77

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          Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel dopamine receptor (D3) as a target for neuroleptics.

          A dopamine receptor has been characterized which differs in its pharmacology and signalling system from the D1 or D2 receptor and represents both an autoreceptor and a postsynaptic receptor. The D3 receptor is localized to limbic areas of the brain, which are associated with cognitive, emotional and endocrine functions. It seems to mediate some of the effects of antipsychotic drugs and drugs used against Parkinson's disease, that were previously thought to interact only with D2 receptors.
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            Cocaine addiction: psychology and neurophysiology.

            Cocaine was considered incapable of producing dependence in 1980 but was recently proclaimed the drug of greatest national health concern. Recent clinical and preclinical investigations demonstrate that cocaine produces unique abuse and withdrawal patterns that differ from those of other major abused drugs and suggest that long-term cocaine abuse produces neurophysiological alterations in specific systems in the central nervous system that regulate the capacity to experience pleasure. It will be necessary to develop clinically pertinent research models before these findings can be considered definitive, but these evolving ideas have already led to applications of promising experimental treatments for cocaine abuse.
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              Neurobiology of addiction.

              Roy Wise (1996)
              Addictive drugs have habit-forming actions that can be localized to a variety of brain regions. Recent advances in our understanding of the chemical 'trigger zones' in which individual drugs of abuse initiate their habit-forming actions have revealed that such disparate drugs as heroin, cocaine, nicotine, alcohol, phencyclidine, and cannabis activate common reward circuitry in the brain. Although these drugs have many actions that are distinct, their habit-forming actions (and perhaps the relevant elements of their disparate withdrawal symptoms) appear to have a common denominator, namely, similar effects in the brain mechanisms of reward.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1111/j.1527-3458.2003.tb00246.x
                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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