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      Inter-state differences in caste-specific risks for child deprivation in India

      1 , 2
      Journal of Poverty and Social Justice
      Bristol University Press

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          Abstract

          The issue of caste has long been an important structural cause of poverty in India, with certain groups and communities socially and physically excluded from the benefits of national economic and social development. While differences between groups are often explained at national and state levels, this paper focuses instead on the issue of inter-state caste-specific risks of child poverty and basic needs deprivation. We show that while children from schedule caste and tribe (SC/ST) communities fare poorly at the national level, it need not be so given some states manage to protect SC/ST children, ensuring outcomes for them are on a par or better than for children from higher caste groups. Caste and tribe status need not condemn children to lives of poverty, and this paper identifies for policy makers where caste and tribe status remain important drivers of poverty and disparities for children. Tackling these would be a start for making India a more equitable society in coming decades.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of Poverty and Social Justice
          Bristol University Press
          1759-8281
          1759-8273
          February 2017
          February 2017
          : 25
          : 1
          : 3-20
          Affiliations
          [1 ]University of Gothenburg, Sweden
          [2 ]Cardiff University, UK
          Article
          10.1332/175982716X14822521840953
          0506f64f-daae-4a73-adb2-e6b2522a10cd
          © 2017
          History

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