17
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      EBV based cancer prevention and therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

      NPJ precision oncology

      Springer Nature

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 64

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Epstein-Barr virus: more than 50 years old and still providing surprises.

          It is more than 50 years since the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the first human tumour virus, was discovered. EBV has subsequently been found to be associated with a diverse range of tumours of both lymphoid and epithelial origin. Progress in the molecular analysis of EBV has revealed fundamental mechanisms of more general relevance to the oncogenic process. This Timeline article highlights key milestones in the 50-year history of EBV and discusses how this virus provides a paradigm for exploiting insights at the molecular level in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cancer.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Regulation of the latent-lytic switch in Epstein-Barr virus.

            Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection contributes to the development of several different types of human malignancy, including Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. As a herpesvirus, EBV can establish latent or lytic infection in cells. EBV-positive tumors are composed almost exclusively of cells with latent EBV infection. Strategies for inducing the lytic form of EBV infection in tumor cells are being investigated as a potential therapy for EBV-positive tumors. In this article, we review how cellular and viral proteins regulate the latent-lytic EBV switch in infected B cells and epithelial cells, and discuss how harnessing lytic viral reactivation might be used therapeutically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Host shutoff during productive Epstein-Barr virus infection is mediated by BGLF5 and may contribute to immune evasion.

              Relatively little is known about immune evasion during the productive phase of infection by the gamma(1)-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The use of a unique system to isolate cells in lytic cycle allowed us to identify a host shutoff function operating in productively EBV-infected B cells. This impairment of protein synthesis results from mRNA degradation induced upon expression of the early lytic-cycle gene product BGLF5. Recently, a gamma(2)-herpesvirus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, has also been shown to encode a host shutoff function, indicating that host shutoff appears to be a general feature of gamma-herpesviruses. One of the consequences of host shutoff is a block in the synthesis of HLA class I and II molecules, reflected by reduced levels of these antigen-presenting complexes at the surface of cells in EBV lytic cycle. This effect could lead to escape from T cell recognition and elimination of EBV-producing cells, thereby allowing generation of viral progeny in the face of memory T cell responses.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1038/s41698-017-0018-x

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                Comments

                Comment on this article