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      Development of a Vascularized Heterotopic Neonatal Rat Heart Transplantation Model.

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          Abstract

          Rodent adult-to-adult heterotopic heart transplantation is a well-established animal model, and the detailed surgical technique with several modifications has been previously described. In immature donor organ transplantation, however, the surgical technique needs to be revised given the smaller size and fragility of the donor graft. Here, we report our surgical technique for heterotopic abdominal (AHTx) and femoral (FHTx) neonatal rat heart transplantation based on an experience of over 300 cases.

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          Most cited references 18

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          Vessel formation. De novo formation of a distinct coronary vascular population in neonatal heart.

          The postnatal coronary vessels have been viewed as developing through expansion of vessels formed during the fetal period. Using genetic lineage tracing, we found that a substantial portion of postnatal coronary vessels arise de novo in the neonatal mouse heart, rather than expanding from preexisting embryonic vasculature. Our data show that lineage conversion of neonatal endocardial cells during trabecular compaction generates a distinct compartment of the coronary circulation located within the inner half of the ventricular wall. This lineage conversion occurs within a brief period after birth and provides an efficient means of rapidly augmenting the coronary vasculature. This mechanism of postnatal coronary vascular growth provides avenues for understanding and stimulating cardiovascular regeneration following injury and disease. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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            Endocardial fibroelastosis is caused by aberrant endothelial to mesenchymal transition.

            Endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) is a unique form of fibrosis, which forms a de novo subendocardial tissue layer encapsulating the myocardium and stunting its growth, and which is typically associated with congenital heart diseases of heterogeneous origin, such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Relevance of EFE was only recently highlighted through the establishment of staged biventricular repair surgery in infant patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, where surgical removal of EFE tissue has resulted in improvement in the restrictive physiology leading to the growth of the left ventricle in parallel with somatic growth. However, pathomechanisms underlying EFE formation are still scarce, and specific therapeutic targets are not yet known.
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              TRANSPLANTATION OF CARDIAC TISSUE INTO THE MOUSE EAR.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Eur Surg Res
                European surgical research. Europaische chirurgische Forschung. Recherches chirurgicales europeennes
                S. Karger AG
                1421-9921
                0014-312X
                2016
                : 57
                : 3-4
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Cardiac Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., USA.
                Article
                000447691
                10.1159/000447691
                27544776

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