Blog
About


261
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
    • Record: found
    • Abstract: found
    • Article: found
    Is Open Access

    Hydrodynamic surrogate models for bio-inspired micro-swimming robots

    ,

    1311.3429

    Read Bookmark
        There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

        Abstract

        Research on untethered micro-swimming robots is growing fast owing to their potential impact on minimally invasive medical procedures. Candidate propulsion mechanisms of robots are based on flagellar mechanisms of micro organisms such as rotating rigid helices and traveling plane-waves on flexible rods. For design and control of swimming robots, accurate real-time models are necessary to compute trajectories, velocities and hydrodynamic forces acting on robots. Resistive force theory (RFT) provides an excellent framework for the development of real-time six degrees-of-freedom surrogate models for design optimization and control. However the accuracy of RFT-based models depends strongly on hydrodynamic interactions. Here, we introduce interaction coefficients that only multiply body resistance coefficients with no modification to local resistance coefficients on the tail. Interaction coefficients are obtained for a single specimen of Vibrio Algino reported in literature, and used in the RFT model for comparisons of forward velocities and body rotation rates against other specimens. Furthermore, CFD simulations are used to obtain forward and lateral velocities and body rotation rates of bio-inspired swimmers with helical tails and traveling-plane waves for a range of amplitudes and wavelengths. Interaction coefficients are obtained from the CFD simulation for the helical tail with the specified amplitude and wavelength, and used in the RFT model for comparisons of velocities and body rotation rates for other designs. Comparisons indicate that hydrodynamic models that employ interaction coefficients prove to be viable surrogates for computationally intensive three-dimensional time-dependent CFD models. Lastly, hydrodynamic models of bio-inspired swimmers are used to obtain optimal amplitudes and wavelengths of flagellar mechanisms, as a demonstration of the approach.

        Related collections

        Most cited references 4

        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Microrobots for minimally invasive medicine.

        Microrobots have the potential to revolutionize many aspects of medicine. These untethered, wirelessly controlled and powered devices will make existing therapeutic and diagnostic procedures less invasive and will enable new procedures never before possible. The aim of this review is threefold: first, to provide a comprehensive survey of the technological state of the art in medical microrobots; second, to explore the potential impact of medical microrobots and inspire future research in this field; and third, to provide a collection of valuable information and engineering tools for the design of medical microrobots.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Flexive and Propulsive Dynamics of Elastica at Low Reynolds Numbers

          A stiff one-armed swimmer in glycerine goes nowhere, but if its arm is elastic, exerting a restorative torque proportional to local curvature, the swimmer can go on its way. Considering this happy consequence and the principles of elasticity, we study a hyperdiffusion equation for the shape of the elastica in viscous flow, find solutions for impulsive or oscillatory forcing, and elucidate relevant aspects of propulsion. These results have application in a variety of physical and biological contexts, from dynamic biopolymer bending experiments to instabilities of elastic filaments.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Propulsion Method for Swimming Microrobots

              Bookmark

              Author and article information

              Journal
              14 November 2013

              http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

              Custom metadata
              37 pages, 6 figures
              physics.flu-dyn cs.RO

              Comments

              Comment on this article

              Register to benefit from advanced discovery features on more than 34,000,000 articles

              Already registered?

              Email*:
              Password*: