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      Improvements in Transfemoral Catheterization Access Techniques

      , *

      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

      Complications, Coronary angiography, Percutaneous coronary intervention

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          Most cited references 11

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          Radial versus femoral access for coronary angiography or intervention and the impact on major bleeding and ischemic events: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

          Small randomized trials have demonstrated that radial access reduces access site complications compared to a femoral approach. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine if radial access reduces major bleeding and as a result can reduce death and ischemic events compared to femoral access. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched from 1980 to April 2008. Relevant conference abstracts from 2005 to April 2008 were searched. Randomized trials comparing radial versus femoral access coronary angiography or intervention that reported major bleeding, death, myocardial infarction, and procedural or fluoroscopy time were included. A fixed-effects model was used with a random effects for sensitivity analysis. Radial access reduced major bleeding by 73% compared to femoral access (0.05% vs 2.3%, OR 0.27 [95% CI 0.16, 0.45], P < .001). There was a trend for reductions in the composite of death, myocardial infarction, or stroke (2.5% vs 3.8%, OR 0.71 [95% CI 0.49-1.01], P = .058) as well as death (1.2% vs 1.8% OR 0.74 [95% CI 0.42-1.30], P = .29). There was a trend for higher rate of inability to the cross lesion with wire, balloon, or stent during percutaneous coronary intervention with radial access (4.7% vs 3.4% OR 1.29 [95% CI 0.87, 1.94], P = .21). Radial access reduced hospital stay by 0.4 days (95% CI 0.2-0.5, P = .0001). Radial access reduced major bleeding and there was a corresponding trend for reduction in ischemic events compared to femoral access. Large randomized trials are needed to confirm the benefit of radial access on death and ischemic events.
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            Transradial approach for coronary angiography and interventions: results of the first international transradial practice survey.

            The aim of this study was to evaluate practice of transradial approach (TRA). TRA has been adopted as an alternative access site for coronary procedures. A questionnaire was distributed worldwide with Internet-based software. The survey was conducted from August 2009 to January 2010 among 1,107 interventional cardiologists in 75 countries. Although pre-TRA dual hand circulation testing is not uniform in the world, >85% in the U.S. perform Allen or oximetry testing. Right radial artery is used in almost 90%. Judkins catheters are the most popular for left coronary artery angiographies (66.5%) and right coronary artery angiographies (58.8%). For percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), 6-F is now standard. For PCI of left coronary artery, operators use standard extra back-up guiding catheters in >65% and, for right coronary artery 70.4% use right Judkins catheters. Although heparin remains the routine antithrombotic agent in the world, bivalirudin is frequently used in the U.S. for PCI. The incidence of radial artery occlusion before hospital discharge is not assessed in >50%. Overall, approximately 50% responded that their TRA practice will increase in the future (68.4% in the U.S.). TRA is already widely used across the world. Diagnostic and guiding-catheters used for TRA remain similar to those used for traditional femoral approach, suggesting that specialized radial catheters are not frequently used. However, there is substantial variation in practice as it relates to specific aspects of TRA, suggesting that more data are needed to determine the optimal strategy to facilitate TRA and optimize radial artery patency after catheterization. Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Adoption of radial access and comparison of outcomes to femoral access in percutaneous coronary intervention: an updated report from the national cardiovascular data registry (2007-2012).

              Radial access for percutaneous coronary intervention (r-PCI) is associated with reduced vascular complications; however, previous reports have shown that <2% of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures in the United States are performed via the radial approach. Our aims were to evaluate temporal trends in r-PCI and compare procedural outcomes between r-PCI and transfemoral PCI. We conducted a retrospective cohort study from the CathPCI registry (n=2 820 874 procedures from 1381 sites) between January 2007 and September 2012. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the adjusted association between r-PCI and bleeding, vascular complications, and procedural success, using transfemoral PCI as the reference. Outcomes in high-risk subgroups such as age ≥75 years, women, and patients with acute coronary syndrome were also examined. The proportion of r-PCI procedures increased from 1.2% in quarter 1 2007 to 16.1% in quarter 3 2012 and accounted for 6.3% of total procedures from 2007 to 2012 (n=178 643). After multivariable adjustment, r-PCI use in the studied cohort of patients was associated with lower risk of bleeding (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.54) and lower risk of vascular complications (adjusted odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.50) in comparison with transfemoral PCI. The reduction in bleeding and vascular complications was consistent across important subgroups of age, sex, and clinical presentation. There has been increasing adoption of r-PCI in the United States. Transradial PCI now accounts for 1 of 6 PCIs performed in contemporary clinical practice. In comparison with traditional femoral access, transradial PCI is associated with lower vascular and bleeding complication rates.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2014
                August 2014
                09 July 2014
                : 129
                : 1
                : 36-38
                Affiliations
                Division of Cardiology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown Medical School, Providence, R.I., USA
                Author notes
                *Assoc Prof. J. Dawn Abbott, MD, Division of Cardiology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown Medical School, 814 APC, 593 Eddy St, Providence, RI (USA), E-Mail jabbott@lifespan.org
                Article
                362924 Cardiology 2014;129:36-38
                10.1159/000362924
                25012629
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

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