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      Kidney Stone Disease: An Update on Current Concepts.

      1 , 2 , 1

      Advances in urology

      Hindawi Limited

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          Abstract

          Kidney stone disease is a crystal concretion formed usually within the kidneys. It is an increasing urological disorder of human health, affecting about 12% of the world population. It has been associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal failure. The etiology of kidney stone is multifactorial. The most common type of kidney stone is calcium oxalate formed at Randall's plaque on the renal papillary surfaces. The mechanism of stone formation is a complex process which results from several physicochemical events including supersaturation, nucleation, growth, aggregation, and retention of urinary stone constituents within tubular cells. These steps are modulated by an imbalance between factors that promote or inhibit urinary crystallization. It is also noted that cellular injury promotes retention of particles on renal papillary surfaces. The exposure of renal epithelial cells to oxalate causes a signaling cascade which leads to apoptosis by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Currently, there is no satisfactory drug to cure and/or prevent kidney stone recurrences. Thus, further understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney stone formation is a research area to manage urolithiasis using new drugs. Therefore, this review has intended to provide a compiled up-to-date information on kidney stone etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention approaches.

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          Most cited references 94

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          Physiopathology and etiology of stone formation in the kidney and the urinary tract

           Andrew P Evan (2009)
          All stones share similar presenting symptoms, and urine supersaturation with respect to the mineral phase of the stone is essential for stone formation. However, recent studies using papillary biopsies of stone formers have provided a view of the histology of renal crystal deposition which suggests that the early sequence of events leading to stone formation differs greatly, depending on the type of stone and on the urine chemistry leading to supersaturation. Three general pathways for kidney stone formation are seen: (1) stones fixed to the surface of a renal papilla at sites of interstitial apatite plaque (termed Randall’s plaque), as seen in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers; (2) stones attached to plugs protruding from the openings of ducts of Bellini, as seen in hyperoxaluria and distal tubular acidosis; and (3) stones forming in free solution in the renal collection system, as in cystinuria. The presence of hydroxyapatite crystals in either the interstitial or tubule compartment (and sometimes both) of the renal medulla in stone formers is the rule and has implications for the initial steps of stone formation and the potential for renal injury.
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            Nanobacteria: an alternative mechanism for pathogenic intra- and extracellular calcification and stone formation.

            Calcium phosphate is deposited in many diseases, but formation mechanisms remain speculative. Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. The biomineralization in cell culture media resulted in biofilms and mineral aggregates closely resembling those found in tissue calcification and kidney stones. In nanobacteria-infected fibroblasts, electron microscopy revealed intra- and extracellular acicular crystal deposits, stainable with von Kossa staining and resembling calcospherules found in pathological calcification. Previous models for stone formation have led to an hypothesis that elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity is a lithogenic factor. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4, at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Nanobacteria can produce apatite in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and provide a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification.
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              Reactive oxygen species, inflammation and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

               Saeed R Khan (2014)
              Calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones are formed attached to Randall’s plaques (RPs) or Randall’s plugs. Mechanisms involved in the formation and growth are poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that stone formation is a form of pathological biomineralization or ectopic calcification. Pathological calcification and plaque formation in the body is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the development of oxidative stress (OS). This review explores clinical and experimental data in support of ROS involvement in the formation of CaOx kidney stones. Under normal conditions the production of ROS is tightly controlled, increasing when and where needed. Results of clinical and experimental studies show that renal epithelial exposure to high oxalate and crystals of CaOx/calcium phosphate (CaP) generates excess ROS, causing injury and inflammation. Major markers of OS and inflammation are detectable in urine of stone patients as well as rats with experimentally induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Antioxidant treatments reduce crystal and oxalate induced injury in tissue culture and animal models. Significantly lower serum levels of antioxidants, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthine have been found in individuals with a history of kidney stones. A diet rich in antioxidants has been shown to reduce stone episodes. ROS regulate crystal formation, growth and retention through the timely production of crystallization modulators. In the presence of abnormal calcium, citrate, oxalate, and/or phosphate, however, there is an overproduction of ROS and a decrease in the antioxidant capacity resulting in OS, renal injury and inflammation. Cellular degradation products in the urine promote crystallization in the tubular lumen at a faster rate thus blocking the tubule and plugging the tubular openings at the papillary tips forming Randall’s plugs. Renal epithelial cells lining the loops of Henle/collecting ducts may become osteogenic, producing membrane vesicles at the basal side. In addition endothelial cells lining the blood vessels may also become osteogenic producing membrane vesicles. Calcification of the vesicles gives rise to RPs. The growth of the RP’s is sustained by mineralization of collagen laid down as result of inflammation and fibrosis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Adv Urol
                Advances in urology
                Hindawi Limited
                1687-6369
                1687-6369
                2018
                : 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Microbial, Cellular and Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
                [2 ] Department of Biology, Debre Birhan University, P.O. Box 445, Debre Birhan, Ethiopia.
                Article
                10.1155/2018/3068365
                5817324
                29515627
                cb16a525-5f70-4f4e-8e3f-51b980785ae6

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