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      Structure of mandibles in relation to trophic niche differentiation in a tropical millipede community

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      International Journal of Myriapodology

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Isotopic composition of nitrogen in 19 species of Diplopoda from a tropical monsoon forest (Cat Tien National Park, southern Vietnam) which supports one of the most diverse millipede faunules globally (no less than 36 species from 17 families and 11 orders) forms a wide continuum of δ15N values ranging from -2.4 to +6.8‰. This suggests a trophic niche differentiation among species. Variation in mouthpart structure could presumably reflect the different foods consumed by species representing at least higher taxa (families and orders). The fine structure of the mandibles in ten sympatric, mostly even syntopic species of Diplopoda does differ considerably between the higher taxa, but neither at the generic nor species level. Neither clear-cut trends in nor evident morphological patterns of, nor significant correlations between the structure of mandibles in Diplopoda species that have different isotopic compositions of nitrogen and presumably exploit different food resources, have been revealed.

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          Most cited references 26

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          Interactions between Aboveground and Belowground Biodiversity in Terrestrial Ecosystems: Patterns, Mechanisms, and Feedbacks

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            The long and short of food-chain length

             David Post (2002)
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              Areas, cradles and museums: the latitudinal gradient in species richness.

              Although numerous factors are postulated to be responsible for the gradient of increasing taxon richness towards lower latitudes, it has recently been suggested that the primary determinant is geographic area. This area model is appealing in its logic, but there is little empirical evidence to support it and several other mechanisms might also interact to obscure its effects. Nonetheless, the model has highlighted several fundamental issues concerning range size, speciation and extinction that, despite their considerable significance, remain poorly understood.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Myriapodology
                IJM
                Pensoft Publishers
                1875-2543
                1875-2535
                December 20 2011
                December 20 2011
                : 6
                : 37-49
                Article
                10.3897/ijm.6.2214
                © 2011
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