18
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Decline in Cardiovascular Mortality: Possible Causes and Implications.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          If the control of infectious diseases was the public health success story of the first half of the 20th century, then the decline in mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke has been the success story of the century's past 4 decades. The early phase of this decline in coronary heart disease and stroke was unexpected and controversial when first reported in the mid-1970s, having followed 60 years of gradual increase as the US population aged. However, in 1978, the participants in a conference convened by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute concluded that a significant recent downtick in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality rates had definitely occurred, at least in the US Since 1978, a sharp decline in mortality rates from coronary heart disease and stroke has become unmistakable throughout the industrialized world, with age-adjusted mortality rates having declined to about one third of their 1960s baseline by 2000. Models have shown that this remarkable decline has been fueled by rapid progress in both prevention and treatment, including precipitous declines in cigarette smoking, improvements in hypertension treatment and control, widespread use of statins to lower circulating cholesterol levels, and the development and timely use of thrombolysis and stents in acute coronary syndrome to limit or prevent infarction. However, despite the huge growth in knowledge and advances in prevention and treatment, there remain many questions about this decline. In fact, there is evidence that the rate of decline may have abated and may even be showing early signs of reversal in some population groups. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, through a request for information, is soliciting input that could inform a follow-up conference on or near the 40th anniversary of the original landmark conference to further explore these trends in cardiovascular mortality in the context of what has come before and what may lie ahead.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Circ. Res.
          Circulation research
          Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
          1524-4571
          0009-7330
          Jan 20 2017
          : 120
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] From the Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (CTRIS) (G.A.M., M.M.E.) and Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (G.S.W., P.D.S., L.J.F., Y.R., P.G.K., M.E.M., L.L.H., E.A., D.G.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD. George.Mensah@nih.gov.
          [2 ] From the Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (CTRIS) (G.A.M., M.M.E.) and Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (G.S.W., P.D.S., L.J.F., Y.R., P.G.K., M.E.M., L.L.H., E.A., D.G.), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD.
          Article
          CIRCRESAHA.116.309115 NIHMS839089
          10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.309115
          5268076
          28104770
          ac2c455c-313e-4b53-8f4b-4e134df613fe
          History

          cardiovascular diseases,coronary disease,hypertension,mortality,risk factors

          Comments

          Comment on this article