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      The Somatotropic Axis in Human Aging: Framework for the Current State of Knowledge and Future Research.

      1 , 2 , 3
      Cell metabolism

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          Abstract

          Mutations resulting in reduced signaling of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF-1) axis are associated with increased life- and healthspan across model organisms. Similar findings have been noted in human cohorts with functional mutations in the somatotropic axis, suggesting that this pathway may also be relevant to human aging and protection from age-related diseases. While epidemiological data indicate that low circulating IGF-1 level may protect aging populations from cancer, results remain inconclusive regarding most other diseases. We propose that studies in humans and animals need to consider differences in sex, pathway function, organs, and time-specific effects of GH/IGF-1 signaling in order to better define the role of the somatotropic axis in aging. Agents that modulate signaling of the GH/IGF-1 pathway are available for human use, but before they can be implemented in clinical studies that target aging and age-related diseases, researchers need to address the challenges discussed in this Review.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Cell Metab.
          Cell metabolism
          1932-7420
          1550-4131
          Jun 14 2016
          : 23
          : 6
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Electronic address: sofiya.milman@einstein.yu.edu.
          [2 ] Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
          [3 ] Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
          Article
          S1550-4131(16)30232-7 NIHMS791172
          10.1016/j.cmet.2016.05.014
          4919980
          27304500
          b691c458-6e23-4175-b915-5d4e702cef04
          Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
          History

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