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      The Embodied GIS. Using Mixed Reality to explore multi-sensory archaeological landscapes

      , L – P: Archaeology
      Internet Archaeology
      Council for British Archaeology

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          Abstract

          "We are at a turning point in development and thought about multi-sensorial engagement using digital mediation. From Oculus Rift VR goggles, Google Cardboard, noise-reducing headphones, vibrating-haptic simulating gloves, smell generators and virtual treadmills, every week a new technology or software emerges that can be used to virtualise, augment or diminish our reality, across all of our senses. In many cases these technologies have been used by archaeologists or museum professionals to didactically present or reconstruct archaeological sites or artefacts. However, Mixed Reality is rarely used to actively explore or analyse archaeological sites. This article explores a number of ways that these new multi-sensory developments can be harnessed and linked to a traditional GIS database using Mixed Reality. Through the example of three different sensory applications, I will demonstrate the implementation of an embodied GIS - allowing a multi-sensorial experience of archaeological data in situ, and enabling archaeologists to explore data in new ways, encouraging new interpretations by thinking and working through the body."

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          Most cited references22

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          The Perception of the Environment: Essays in Livelihood, Dwelling and Skill

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            The Perception of the Environment

            Tim Ingold (2002)
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              Exploring the topography of mind: GIS, social space and archaeology

              The later-prehistoric linear ditches that divide the chalk landscape of Wessex, south England, are markers in an area. It is a topographic space. The ditches seem to be placed with a view to their visibility in the landscape. It is a human topographic space. A GIS study of the ditches' place, in terms of what a human sees in moving acros undulating ground, goes beyond that environmental determinism which underlies many GIS studies.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Internet Archaeology
                Internet Archaeol.
                Council for British Archaeology
                13635387
                2017
                2017
                : 44
                Article
                10.11141/ia.44.3
                03a6148b-b258-4c11-9b30-24805235f487
                © 2017
                History

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