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      Age-Dependent Niche Signals from the Choroid Plexus Regulate Adult Neural Stem Cells.

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          Abstract

          Specialized niches support the lifelong maintenance and function of tissue-specific stem cells. Adult neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) contact the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which flows through the lateral ventricles. A largely ignored component of the V-SVZ stem cell niche is the lateral ventricle choroid plexus (LVCP), a primary producer of CSF. Here we show that the LVCP, in addition to performing important homeostatic support functions, secretes factors that promote colony formation and proliferation of purified quiescent and activated V-SVZ stem cells and transit-amplifying cells. The functional effect of the LVCP secretome changes throughout the lifespan, with activated neural stem cells being especially sensitive to age-related changes. Transcriptome analysis identified multiple factors that recruit colony formation and highlights novel facets of LVCP function. Thus, the LVCP is a key niche compartment that translates physiological changes into molecular signals directly affecting neural stem cell behavior.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Cell Stem Cell
          Cell stem cell
          Elsevier BV
          1875-9777
          1875-9777
          Nov 03 2016
          : 19
          : 5
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Biozentrum, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
          [2 ] Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
          [3 ] Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
          [4 ] Biozentrum, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: fiona.doetsch@unibas.ch.
          Article
          S1934-5909(16)30163-1
          10.1016/j.stem.2016.06.013
          27452173

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