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      Home Health Service Provision After Hurricane Harvey

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          Abstract

          Objective:

          To determine the extent of service disruption among home health agencies impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

          Methods:

          Structured interviews with optional open-ended questions were conducted with home health agencies in and around Houston, Texas. A random sample of 277 agencies was selected and contacted via telephone during the study period, from February to May of 2018.

          Results:

          Only 45% of 122 participating agencies indicated that their offices were open during Hurricane Harvey, and three-fourths reported that home visits were disrupted. The length of disruption varied: 7% reported a disruption of 1 day or less and 46% indicated a disruption of 1 week or longer. Disruption occurred even though nearly all (99%) of the agencies had—and close to all (92%) of them activated—an emergency preparedness plan.

          Conclusions:

          Although most of the participating home health agencies activated their emergency preparedness plan, significant disruption in home health services occurred. While agencies are required to have clear, detailed plans in place, gaps in effective implementation of emergency preparedness plans remain.

          Related collections

          Most cited references12

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          Building Resilience

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            Missed dialysis sessions and hospitalization in hemodialysis patients after Hurricane Katrina.

            In order to evaluate the factors that contributed to missed dialysis sessions and increased hospitalizations of hemodialysis patients after Hurricane Katrina, we contacted 386 patients from 9 New Orleans hemodialysis units. Data were collected through structured telephone interviews on socio-demographics, dialysis factors, and evacuation characteristics. Overall, 44% of patients reported missing at least one and almost 17% reported missing 3 or more dialysis sessions. The likelihood of missing 3 or more sessions was greater for those whose dialysis vintage was less than 2 years compared to those for whom it was 5 or more years, who had 38 or fewer billed dialysis sessions compared to those who had 39 or more in the 3 months before the storm, who lived alone before the storm, who were unaware of their dialysis facility's emergency plans, who did not evacuate prior to hurricane landfall, and who were placed in a shelter. The adjusted odds ratio of hospitalization among patients who missed 3 or more compared to those who did not miss any dialysis sessions was 2.16 (95% CI: 1.05-4.43). These findings suggest that when preparing for future disasters more emphasis needs to be placed on patient awareness and early execution of emergency plans.
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              Heat Wave

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                101297401
                34213
                Disaster Med Public Health Prep
                Disaster Med Public Health Prep
                Disaster medicine and public health preparedness
                1935-7893
                1938-744X
                18 December 2019
                February 2020
                01 August 2020
                : 14
                : 1
                : 56-62
                Affiliations
                University of Michigan, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Dr Iwashyna) and University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Dr Bell and Ms Horowitz).
                Author notes
                Correspondence and reprint requests to Sue Anne Bell, University of Michigan School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 ( sabell@ 123456umich.edu ).
                Article
                PMC7075394 PMC7075394 7075394 nihpa1522548
                10.1017/dmp.2019.27
                7075394
                31218986
                422bfbb1-6d42-476a-92f8-ee97df04450c
                Categories
                Article

                home health agency,older adults,Hurricane Harvey,health services utilization

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