Blog
About

116
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    16
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      A C. elegans mutant that lives twice as long as wild type.

      Nature

      Reproduction, Temperature, growth & development, genetics, physiology, Disorders of Sex Development, Genes, Helminth, Larva, Longevity, Mutation, Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We have found that mutations in the gene daf-2 can cause fertile, active, adult Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites to live more than twice as long as wild type. This lifespan extension, the largest yet reported in any organism, requires the activity of a second gene, daf-16. Both genes also regulate formation of the dauer larva, a developmentally arrested larval form that is induced by crowding and starvation and is very long-lived. Our findings raise the possibility that the longevity of the dauer is not simply a consequence of its arrested growth, but instead results from a regulated lifespan extension mechanism that can be uncoupled from other aspects of dauer formation. daf-2 and daf-16 provide entry points into understanding how lifespan can be extended.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 13

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Interacting genes in nematode dauer larva formation.

          The dauer larva of Caenorhabditis elegans is a developmentally arrested stage induced by starvation or overcrowding. Mutant genes controlling the ability to form dauer larvae interact in a way which allows them to be ordered in a pathway. Mutant phenotypes suggest that the pathway corresponds to neural processing of environmental stimuli.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Dopaminergic neurons in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

            Dopamine is the putative transmitter of eight neurons in the hermaphrodite form of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These include the cephalic and deirid neurons, which are believed to be mechanosensory. The male has an additional six dopaminergic neurons in the tail. Mutants have been selected which have defects in the formaldehyde induced fluorescence and lack dopamine to varying degrees, but they are not insensitive to touch. The dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans are compared with the homologous neurons in Ascaris lumbricoides.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Non-ageing developmental variant of Caenorhabditis elegans.

               D Hirsh,  Daniel Klass (1976)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1038/366461a0
                8247153

                Comments

                Comment on this article