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      KRAS mutation: from undruggable to druggable in cancer

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          Abstract

          Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, and its treatment and outcomes have been dramatically revolutionised by targeted therapies. As the most frequently mutated oncogene, Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS) has attracted substantial attention. The understanding of KRAS is constantly being updated by numerous studies on KRAS in the initiation and progression of cancer diseases. However, KRAS has been deemed a challenging therapeutic target, even “undruggable”, after drug-targeting efforts over the past four decades. Recently, there have been surprising advances in directly targeted drugs for KRAS, especially in KRAS (G12C) inhibitors, such as AMG510 (sotorasib) and MRTX849 (adagrasib), which have obtained encouraging results in clinical trials. Excitingly, AMG510 was the first drug-targeting KRAS (G12C) to be approved for clinical use this year. This review summarises the most recent understanding of fundamental aspects of KRAS, the relationship between the KRAS mutations and tumour immune evasion, and new progress in targeting KRAS, particularly KRAS (G12C). Moreover, the possible mechanisms of resistance to KRAS (G12C) inhibitors and possible combination therapies are summarised, with a view to providing the best regimen for individualised treatment with KRAS (G12C) inhibitors and achieving truly precise treatment.

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          Most cited references242

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          Hallmarks of Cancer: The Next Generation

          The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human tumors. The hallmarks constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of neoplastic disease. They include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis. Underlying these hallmarks are genome instability, which generates the genetic diversity that expedites their acquisition, and inflammation, which fosters multiple hallmark functions. Conceptual progress in the last decade has added two emerging hallmarks of potential generality to this list-reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. In addition to cancer cells, tumors exhibit another dimension of complexity: they contain a repertoire of recruited, ostensibly normal cells that contribute to the acquisition of hallmark traits by creating the "tumor microenvironment." Recognition of the widespread applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of new means to treat human cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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            Understanding the tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) for effective therapy

            The clinical successes in immunotherapy have been both astounding and at the same time unsatisfactory. Countless patients with varied tumor types have seen pronounced clinical response with immunotherapeutic intervention; however, many more patients have experienced minimal or no clinical benefit when provided the same treatment. As technology has advanced, so has the understanding of the complexity and diversity of the immune context of the tumor microenvironment and its influence on response to therapy. It has been possible to identify different subclasses of immune environment that have an influence on tumor initiation and response and therapy; by parsing the unique classes and subclasses of tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) that exist within a patient’s tumor, the ability to predict and guide immunotherapeutic responsiveness will improve, and new therapeutic targets will be revealed.
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              Nivolumab versus Docetaxel in Advanced Squamous-Cell Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

              New England Journal of Medicine, 373(2), 123-135
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy
                Sig Transduct Target Ther
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                2059-3635
                December 2021
                November 15 2021
                December 2021
                : 6
                : 1
                Article
                10.1038/s41392-021-00780-4
                cdcac336-9dd7-415b-8389-caad80b21593
                © 2021

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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