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      Central cancellation of self-produced tickle sensation.

      Nature neuroscience
      Adult, Brain, physiology, Brain Mapping, Cerebellum, Female, Hand, Humans, Male, Movement, Physical Stimulation, Self Stimulation, Somatosensory Cortex, Touch

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          Abstract

          A self-produced tactile stimulus is perceived as less ticklish than the same stimulus generated externally. We used fMRI to examine neural responses when subjects experienced a tactile stimulus that was either self-produced or externally produced. More activity was found in somatosensory cortex when the stimulus was externally produced. In the cerebellum, less activity was associated with a movement that generated a tactile stimulus than with a movement that did not. This difference suggests that the cerebellum is involved in predicting the specific sensory consequences of movements, providing the signal that is used to cancel the sensory response to self-generated stimulation.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          10196573
          10.1038/2870

          Chemistry
          Adult,Brain,physiology,Brain Mapping,Cerebellum,Female,Hand,Humans,Male,Movement,Physical Stimulation,Self Stimulation,Somatosensory Cortex,Touch

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