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      Two new species of Fargesia (Poaceae, Bambusoideae) from southwestern China

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      PhytoKeys

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Two new species of Fargesia, one from Xizang (Tibet) and one from Yunnan, China, are described and illustrated. Fargesia viridis D.Z. Li & X.Y. Ye is characterized by its densely white powder, nearly solid internodes, yellow setose sheath scar and culm sheaths, and 4–6 leaves of large size. Fargesia purpurea D.Z. Li & X.Y. Ye has thinner culms (0.5–1.4 cm in diameter), a ring of 4–5 mm tall brown setae below nodes, fewer branches, glabrous sheath scar and culm sheaths, differentiated from the related species.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Why Bamboos Wait So Long to Flower

           D. Janzen (1976)
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            Uplift-driven diversification in the Hengduan Mountains, a temperate biodiversity hotspot.

             Yaowu Xing,  Richard Ree (corresponding) (2017)
            A common hypothesis for the rich biodiversity found in mountains is uplift-driven diversification-that orogeny creates conditions favoring rapid in situ speciation of resident lineages. We tested this hypothesis in the context of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and adjoining mountain ranges, using the phylogenetic and geographic histories of multiple groups of plants to infer the tempo (rate) and mode (colonization versus in situ diversification) of biotic assembly through time and across regions. We focused on the Hengduan Mountains region, which in comparison with the QTP and Himalayas was uplifted more recently (since the late Miocene) and is smaller in area and richer in species. Time-calibrated phylogenetic analyses show that about 8 million y ago the rate of in situ diversification increased in the Hengduan Mountains, significantly exceeding that in the geologically older QTP and Himalayas. By contrast, in the QTP and Himalayas during the same period the rate of in situ diversification remained relatively flat, with colonization dominating lineage accumulation. The Hengduan Mountains flora was thus assembled disproportionately by recent in situ diversification, temporally congruent with independent estimates of orogeny. This study shows quantitative evidence for uplift-driven diversification in this region, and more generally, tests the hypothesis by comparing the rate and mode of biotic assembly jointly across time and space. It thus complements the more prevalent method of examining endemic radiations individually and could be used as a template to augment such studies in other biodiversity hotspots.
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              Ancient orogenic and monsoon-driven assembly of the world’s richest temperate alpine flora

              Understanding how alpine biotas formed in response to historical environmental change may improve our ability to predict and mitigate the threats to alpine species posed by global warming. In the world’s richest temperate alpine flora, that of the Tibet-Himalaya-Hengduan region, phylogenetic reconstructions of biome and geographic range evolution show that extant lineages emerged by the early Oligocene and diversified first in the Hengduan Mountains. By the early to middle Miocene, accelerated diversification and colonization of adjacent regions were likely driven jointly by mountain building and intensification of the Asian monsoon. The alpine flora of the Hengduan Mountains has continuously existed far longer than any other alpine flora on Earth and illustrates how modern biotas have been shaped by past geological and climatic events.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                PhytoKeys
                PK
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2003
                1314-2011
                December 10 2020
                December 10 2020
                : 170
                : 25-37
                Article
                10.3897/phytokeys.170.58780
                © 2020

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