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      The North Staffordshire Osteoarthritis Project – NorStOP: Prospective, 3-year study of the epidemiology and management of clinical osteoarthritis in a general population of older adults

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          Abstract

          Background

          The clinical syndrome of joint pain and stiffness in older people is the commonest cause of disability and health care consultation in this age group. Yet there have been few prospective studies of its course over time and its impact on personal and social life. We plan a cohort study in the general population aged 50 years and over to determine the course and prognosis of hand, hip, knee and foot pain, and the impact of these syndromes on participation levels and health care use.

          Methods

          All patients aged 50 years and over registered with 3 local general practices are to be recruited to a population-based cohort study through the use of a two-stage mailing process. Participants will initially complete a "Health Survey" questionnaire. This will collect information on several areas of life including socio-demographics, general health, physical function, participation, and bodily pain. Those who state that they have experienced any hand problem or any pain in their hands, hips, knees, or feet in the previous 12 months, and also give permission to be re-contacted, will be mailed a "Regional Pains Survey" questionnaire which collects detailed information on the four selected body regions (hand, hips, knees, feet). Follow-up data for the three-year period subsequent to cohort recruitment will be collected through two sources: i) general practice medical records and ii) repeat mailed survey.

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          Most cited references 18

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          Knee pain and osteoarthritis in older adults: a review of community burden and current use of primary health care.

          Osteoarthritis is the single most common cause of disability in older adults, and most patients with the condition will be managed in the community and primary care. To discuss case definition of knee osteoarthritis for primary care and to summarise the burden of the condition in the community and related use of primary health care in the United Kingdom. Narrative review. A literature search identified studies of incidence and prevalence of knee pain, disability, and radiographic osteoarthritis in the general population, and data related to primary care consultations. Findings from UK studies were summarised with reference to European and international studies. During a one year period 25% of people over 55 years have a persistent episode of knee pain, of whom about one in six in the UK and the Netherlands consult their general practitioner about it in the same time period. The prevalence of painful disabling knee osteoarthritis in people over 55 years is 10%, of whom one quarter are severely disabled. Knee osteoarthritis sufficiently severe to consider joint replacement represents a minority of all knee pain and disability suffered by older people. Healthcare provision in primary care needs to focus on this broader group to impact on community levels of pain and disability.
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            Social networks, host resistance, and mortality: a nine-year follow-up study of Alameda County residents.

             L Berkman,  S. Syme (1979)
            The relationship between social and community ties and mortality was assessed using the 1965 Human Population Laboratory survey of a random sample of 6928 adults in Alameda County, California and a subsequent nine-year mortality follow-up. The findings show that people who lacked social and community ties were more likely to die in the follow-up period than those with more extensive contacts. The age-adjusted relative risks for those most isolated when compared to those with the most social contacts were 2.3 for men and 2.8 for women. The association between social ties and mortality was found to be independent of self-reported physical health status at the time of the 1965 survey, year of death, socioeconomic status, and health practices such as smoking, alcoholic beverage consumption, obesity, physical activity, and utilization of preventive health services as well as a cumulative index of health practices.
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              A scale for the estimation of sleep problems in clinical research.

              Problems in sleeping are widely prevalent in modern society and are often one of the presenting complaints of patients consulting physicians. In addition, there is scattered epidemiologic evidence and considerable clinical support that disturbed or inadequate sleep may be a risk factor for clinical emergence of cardiovascular disease and for total mortality. The role of sleep problems both as a precursor and as a sequela of disease states could be better delineated in large groups by the availability of a brief, reliable and standardized scale for sleep disturbance. Such a scale could also be used to evaluate the impact of different therapies upon sleep problems. This paper presents data from two study populations responding to three and four item self-report scales. From 9 to 12% of air traffic controllers reported various sleep problems to have occurred on half or more of the days during the prior month, whereas 12-22% of patients 6 months after cardiac surgery reported such frequent sleep problems. Utilizing data from the 6 and 12 month follow-ups, test-retest reliability of the three-item scale in cardiac surgery patients was found to be 0.59. Internal consistency coefficients for the three and four-item scales were 0.63 and 0.79 respectively.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMC Musculoskelet Disord
                BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
                BioMed Central (London )
                1471-2474
                2004
                13 January 2004
                : 5
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Primary Care Sciences Research Centre, Keele University, Keele, North Staffordshire, United Kingdom, ST5 5BG
                Article
                1471-2474-5-2
                10.1186/1471-2474-5-2
                324560
                14718062
                Copyright © 2004 Thomas et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL.
                Categories
                Study Protocol

                Orthopedics

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