9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Brivaracetam (BRV), a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10–30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV), is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca 2+ channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%–11% unchanged). The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to central nervous system and include fatigue, dizziness, and somnolence; these apparently disappear during treatment. In this review, we analyzed BRV, focusing on the current evidences from experimental animal models to clinical studies with particular interest on potential use in clinical practice. Finally, pharmacological properties of BRV are summarized with a description of its pharmacokinetics, safety, and potential/known drug–drug interactions.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 35

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The neurobiology of antiepileptic drugs.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Brivaracetam as adjunctive treatment for uncontrolled partial epilepsy in adults: a phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

            Brivaracetam (BRV) is a novel high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand currently being investigated for the treatment of epilepsy. The purpose of this phase III study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety/tolerability of adjunctive BRV in adults with uncontrolled partial-onset (focal) seizures.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

              The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2015
                19 October 2015
                : 9
                : 5719-5725
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Neurology, University Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy
                [2 ]Institute of Pharmacology, University Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Emilio Russo, Department of Science of Health, School of Medicine, University of Catanzaro, Viale Europa Germaneto, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy, Tel +39 0961 369 4191 Fax +39 0961 369 4192, Email erusso@ 123456unicz.it
                Article
                dddt-9-5719
                10.2147/DDDT.S81474
                4622453
                © 2015 Mumoli et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Review

                Comments

                Comment on this article