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      Functional Polymer Nanocomposites with Graphene: A Review : Functional Polymer Nanocomposites with Graphene …

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      Macromolecular Materials and Engineering
      Wiley

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          Electric Field Effect in Atomically Thin Carbon Films

          We report a naturally-occurring two-dimensional material (graphene that can be viewed as a gigantic flat fullerene molecule, describe its electronic properties and demonstrate all-metallic field-effect transistor, which uniquely exhibits ballistic transport at submicron distances even at room temperature.
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            The rise of graphene

            Graphene is a rapidly rising star on the horizon of materials science and condensed matter physics. This strictly two-dimensional material exhibits exceptionally high crystal and electronic quality and, despite its short history, has already revealed a cornucopia of new physics and potential applications, which are briefly discussed here. Whereas one can be certain of the realness of applications only when commercial products appear, graphene no longer requires any further proof of its importance in terms of fundamental physics. Owing to its unusual electronic spectrum, graphene has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of 'relativistic' condensed matter physics, where quantum relativistic phenomena, some of which are unobservable in high energy physics, can now be mimicked and tested in table-top experiments. More generally, graphene represents a conceptually new class of materials that are only one atom thick and, on this basis, offers new inroads into low-dimensional physics that has never ceased to surprise and continues to provide a fertile ground for applications.
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              Experimental Observation of Quantum Hall Effect and Berry's Phase in Graphene

              When electrons are confined in two-dimensional (2D) materials, quantum mechanically enhanced transport phenomena, as exemplified by the quantum Hall effects (QHE), can be observed. Graphene, an isolated single atomic layer of graphite, is an ideal realization of such a 2D system. Here, we report an experimental investigation of magneto transport in a high mobility single layer of graphene. Adjusting the chemical potential using the electric field effect, we observe an unusual half integer QHE for both electron and hole carriers in graphene. Vanishing effective carrier masses is observed at Dirac point in the temperature dependent Shubnikov de Haas oscillations, which probe the 'relativistic' Dirac particle-like dispersion. The relevance of Berry's phase to these experiments is confirmed by the phase shift of magneto-oscillations, related to the exceptional topology of the graphene band structure.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Macromolecular Materials and Engineering
                Macromol. Mater. Eng.
                Wiley
                14387492
                August 2014
                August 2014
                February 26 2014
                : 299
                : 8
                : 906-931
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Chemical Engineering; The Petroleum Institute; Abu Dhabi UAE
                Article
                10.1002/mame.201300394
                007ec1e7-cd5b-4f9c-b7e4-7bdd16548da1
                © 2014

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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