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      Astrocytes contacting HIV-1-infected macrophages increase the release of CCL2 in response to the HIV-1-dependent enhancement of membrane-associated TNFα in macrophages.

      Cilia

      immunology, pathology, virology, Astrocytoma, Brain Neoplasms, Cell Communication, Chemokine CCL2, genetics, Chemotaxis, Coculture Techniques, Gene Expression, HIV Infections, U937 Cells, HIV-1, Humans, I-kappa B Proteins, metabolism, Macrophages, Membrane Proteins, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Astrocytes

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          Abstract

          The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected macrophages in the parenchyma of central nervous system is an hallmark of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related neuroinflammation. Once penetrated the blood-brain barrier (BBB), macrophages closely interact with astrocytes, beginning with those lying beneath the BBB endothelium. By investigating the consequences of the cell-cell interaction between HIV-infected macrophages and astrocytes, we observed that the HIV-1 expression in macrophagic cells correlated with increased chemotactic activity in supernatants of astroglial cells. Gene array analysis revealed an impressive increase in the transcription of the gene for the CCL2/MCP-1 chemokine in astroglial cells isolated from HIV-1-infected co-cultures compared with cells from uninfected co-cultures. This phenomenon coupled with the increase in CCL2 release and depended on the cell-cell contact. In addition, it was a consequence of the HIV-1-induced enhancement of membrane-associated tumor necrosis factor-α in macrophagic cells, and correlated with increased levels of nuclear factor kappaB activation in astroglial cells. These observations could mirror a mechanism of recruitment of leukocytes through the BBB, likely contributing to the increase in both viral load and inflammation in central nervous system of HIV-infected patients.

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          Journal
          20737475
          10.1002/glia.21059

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