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      Brain Cancer Stem Cells in Adults and Children: Cell Biology and Therapeutic Implications

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          A restricted cell population propagates glioblastoma growth following chemotherapy

          Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor, with a median survival of about one year 1 . This poor prognosis is due to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence following surgical removal. Precisely how recurrence occurs is unknown. Using a genetically-engineered mouse model of glioma, we identify a subset of endogenous tumor cells that are the source of new tumor cells after the drug, temozolomide (TMZ), is administered to transiently arrest tumor growth. A Nestin-ΔTK-IRES-GFP (Nes-ΔTK-GFP) transgene that labels quiescent subventricular zone adult neural stem cells also labels a subset of endogenous glioma tumor cells. Upon arrest of tumor cell proliferation with TMZ, pulse-chase experiments demonstrate a tumor re-growth cell hierarchy originating with the Nes-ΔTK-GFP transgene subpopulation. Ablation of the GFP+ cells with chronic ganciclovir administration significantly arrested tumor growth and combined TMZ-ganciclovir treatment impeded tumor development. These data indicate the existence of a relatively quiescent subset of endogenous glioma cells that are responsible for sustaining long-term tumor growth through the production of transient populations of highly proliferative cells.
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            Reconstructing and reprogramming the tumor-propagating potential of glioblastoma stem-like cells.

            Developmental fate decisions are dictated by master transcription factors (TFs) that interact with cis-regulatory elements to direct transcriptional programs. Certain malignant tumors may also depend on cellular hierarchies reminiscent of normal development but superimposed on underlying genetic aberrations. In glioblastoma (GBM), a subset of stem-like tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) appears to drive tumor progression and underlie therapeutic resistance yet remain poorly understood. Here, we identify a core set of neurodevelopmental TFs (POU3F2, SOX2, SALL2, and OLIG2) essential for GBM propagation. These TFs coordinately bind and activate TPC-specific regulatory elements and are sufficient to fully reprogram differentiated GBM cells to "induced" TPCs, recapitulating the epigenetic landscape and phenotype of native TPCs. We reconstruct a network model that highlights critical interactions and identifies candidate therapeutic targets for eliminating TPCs. Our study establishes the epigenetic basis of a developmental hierarchy in GBM, provides detailed insight into underlying gene regulatory programs, and suggests attendant therapeutic strategies. PAPERCLIP: Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              HEDGEHOG-GLI1 signaling regulates human glioma growth, cancer stem cell self-renewal, and tumorigenicity.

              Cancer stem cells are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew and to induce tumorigenesis. They are present in gliomas and may be responsible for the lethality of these incurable brain tumors. In the most aggressive and invasive type, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an average of about one year spans the period between detection and death [1]. The resistence of gliomas to current therapies may be related to the existence of cancer stem cells [2-6]. We find that human gliomas display a stemness signature and demonstrate that HEDGEHOG (HH)-GLI signaling regulates the expression of stemness genes in and the self-renewal of CD133(+) glioma cancer stem cells. HH-GLI signaling is also required for sustained glioma growth and survival. It displays additive and synergistic effects with temozolomide (TMZ), the current chemotherapeutic agent of choice. TMZ, however, does not block glioma stem cell self-renewal. Finally, interference of HH-GLI signaling with cyclopamine or through lentiviral-mediated silencing demonstrates that the tumorigenicity of human gliomas in mice requires an active pathway. Our results reveal the essential role of HH-GLI signaling in controlling the behavior of human glioma cancer stem cells and offer new therapeutic possibilities.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Neurotherapeutics
                Neurotherapeutics
                Springer Nature
                1933-7213
                1878-7479
                April 2017
                April 2017
                : 14
                : 2
                : 372-384
                Article
                10.1007/s13311-017-0524-0
                © 2017

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