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      Development and Characterization of A Novel Prox1-EGFP Lymphatic and Schlemm’s Canal Reporter Rat

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          Abstract

          The lymphatic system plays a key role in tissue fluid homeostasis, immune cell trafficking, and fat absorption. We previously reported a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based lymphatic reporter mouse, where EGFP is expressed under the regulation of the Prox1 promoter. This reporter line has been widely used to conveniently visualize lymphatic vessels and other Prox1-expressing tissues such as Schlemm’s canal. However, mice have a number of experimental limitations due to small body size. By comparison, laboratory rats are larger in size and more closely model the metabolic, physiological, and surgical aspects of humans. Here, we report development of a novel lymphatic reporter rat using the mouse Prox1-EGFP BAC. Despite the species mismatch, the mouse Prox1-EGFP BAC enabled a reliable expression of EGFP in Prox1-expressing cells of the transgenic rats and allowed a convenient visualization of all lymphatic vessels, including those in the central nervous system, and Schlemm’s canal. To demonstrate the utility of this new reporter rat, we studied the contractile properties and valvular functions of mesenteric lymphatics, developed a surgical model for vascularized lymph node transplantation, and confirmed Prox1 expression in venous valves. Together, Prox1-EGFP rat model will contribute to the advancement of lymphatic research as a valuable experimental resource.

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          Most cited references 26

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          A gene expression atlas of the central nervous system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes.

          The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains a remarkable array of neural cells, each with a complex pattern of connections that together generate perceptions and higher brain functions. Here we describe a large-scale screen to create an atlas of CNS gene expression at the cellular level, and to provide a library of verified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors and transgenic mouse lines that offer experimental access to CNS regions, cell classes and pathways. We illustrate the use of this atlas to derive novel insights into gene function in neural cells, and into principal steps of CNS development. The atlas, library of BAC vectors and BAC transgenic mice generated in this screen provide a rich resource that allows a broad array of investigations not previously available to the neuroscience community.
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            Lymphatic endothelial cell sphingosine kinase activity is required for lymphocyte egress and lymphatic patterning

            Lymphocyte egress from lymph nodes (LNs) is dependent on sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), but the cellular source of this S1P is not defined. We generated mice that expressed Cre from the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (Lyve-1) locus and that showed efficient recombination of loxP-flanked genes in lymphatic endothelium. We report that mice with Lyve-1 CRE-mediated ablation of sphingosine kinase (Sphk) 1 and lacking Sphk2 have a loss of S1P in lymph while maintaining normal plasma S1P. In Lyve-1 Cre+ Sphk-deficient mice, lymphocyte egress from LNs and Peyer's patches is blocked. Treatment with pertussis toxin to overcome Gαi-mediated retention signals restores lymphocyte egress. Furthermore, in the absence of lymphatic Sphks, the initial lymphatic vessels in nonlymphoid tissues show an irregular morphology and a less organized vascular endothelial cadherin distribution at cell–cell junctions. Our data provide evidence that lymphatic endothelial cells are an in vivo source of S1P required for lymphocyte egress from LNs and Peyer's patches, and suggest a role for S1P in lymphatic vessel maturation.
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              Lymphatic endothelial reprogramming of vascular endothelial cells by the Prox-1 homeobox transcription factor.

              Lymphatic vessels are essential for fluid homeostasis, immune surveillance and fat adsorption, and also serve as a major route for tumor metastasis in many types of cancer. We found that isolated human primary lymphatic and blood vascular endothelial cells (LECs and BECs, respectively) show interesting differences in gene expression relevant for their distinct functions in vivo. Although these phenotypes are stable in vitro and in vivo, overexpression of the homeobox transcription factor Prox-1 in the BECs was capable of inducing LEC-specific gene transcription in the BECs, and, surprisingly, Prox-1 suppressed the expression of approximately 40% of the BEC-specific genes. Prox-1 did not have global effects on the expression of LEC-specific genes in other cell types, except that it up-regulated cyclin E1 and E2 mRNAs and activated the cyclin e promoter in various cell types. These data suggest that Prox-1 acts as a cell proliferation inducer and a fate determination factor for the LECs. Furthermore, the data provide insights into the phenotypic diversity of endothelial cells and into the possibility of transcriptional reprogramming of differentiated endothelial cells.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Alex.Wong@med.usc.edu
                young.hong@usc.edu
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                17 July 2017
                17 July 2017
                2017
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2156 6853, GRID grid.42505.36, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, , Department of Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, ; Los Angeles, California USA
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2156 6853, GRID grid.42505.36, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, , Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, ; Los Angeles, California USA
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2162 3504, GRID grid.134936.a, Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, , University of Missouri, ; Columbia, Missouri USA
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0000 9136 933X, GRID grid.27755.32, Center for Brain Immunology and Glia, , Department of Neuroscience, University of Virginia School of Medicine, ; Charlottesville, Virginia USA
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2248 6943, GRID grid.69566.3a, Department of Regional Innovation, , Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, ; Sendai, Japan
                Article
                6031
                10.1038/s41598-017-06031-3
                5514086
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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