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      Use of High-Definition Audiovisual Technology in a Gross Anatomy Laboratory: Effect on Dental Students' Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction.

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          Abstract

          Laboratory cadaver dissection is essential for three-dimensional understanding of anatomical structures and variability, but there are many challenges to teaching gross anatomy in medical and dental schools, including a lack of available space and qualified anatomy faculty. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of high-definition audiovisual educational technology in the gross anatomy laboratory in improving dental students' learning outcomes and satisfaction. Exam scores were compared for two classes of first-year students at one U.S. dental school: 2012-13 (no audiovisual technology) and 2013-14 (audiovisual technology), and section exams were used to compare differences between semesters. Additionally, an online survey was used to assess the satisfaction of students who used the technology. All 284 first-year students in the two years (2012-13 N=144; 2013-14 N=140) participated in the exams. Of the 140 students in the 2013-14 class, 63 completed the survey (45% response rate). The results showed that those students who used the technology had higher scores on the laboratory exams than those who did not use it, and students in the winter semester scored higher (90.17±0.56) than in the fall semester (82.10±0.68). More than 87% of those surveyed strongly agreed or agreed that the audiovisual devices represented anatomical structures clearly in the gross anatomy laboratory. These students reported an improved experience in learning and understanding anatomical structures, found the laboratory to be less overwhelming, and said they were better able to follow dissection instructions and understand details of anatomical structures with the new technology. Based on these results, the study concluded that the ability to provide the students a clear view of anatomical structures and high-quality imaging had improved their learning experience.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Dent Educ
          Journal of dental education
          1930-7837
          0022-0337
          Feb 2016
          : 80
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Dr. Ahmad is Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; Dr. Sleiman is Instructor, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; Ms. Thomas is a dental student, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; Dr. Kashani is Chairperson and Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; and Dr. Ditmyer is a Vice President, Academy for Academic Leadership, Atlanta, GA, and Emerita Associate Professor, Biomedical Sciences Department, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine. ahmadmk1@udmercy.edu.
          [2 ] Dr. Ahmad is Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; Dr. Sleiman is Instructor, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; Ms. Thomas is a dental student, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; Dr. Kashani is Chairperson and Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry; and Dr. Ditmyer is a Vice President, Academy for Academic Leadership, Atlanta, GA, and Emerita Associate Professor, Biomedical Sciences Department, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine.
          Article
          80/2/128
          26834129

          dental education, educational technology, anatomy

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