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      Family Resilience: A Framework for Clinical Practice

      Family Process
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          The development of competence in favorable and unfavorable environments. Lessons from research on successful children.

          The development of competence holds great interest for parents and society alike. This article considers implications from research on competence and resilience in children and adolescents for policy and interventions designed to foster better outcomes among children at risk. Foundations of competence in early development are discussed, focusing on the role of attachment relationships and self-regulation. Results from studies of competence in the domains of peer relations, conduct, school, work, and activities are highlighted. Lessons are drawn from studies of naturally occurring resilience among children at risk because of disadvantage or trauma and also from efforts to deliberately alter the course of competence through early childhood education and preventive interventions. Converging evidence suggests that the same powerful adaptive systems protect development in both favorable and unfavorable environments.
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            Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory

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              Training to think culturally: a multidimensional comparative framework.

              A multidimensional, comparative training framework is designed to integrate culture with all aspects of family therapy. Culture is viewed as occurring in multiple contexts that create common "cultural borderlands" as well as diversity; unpredictability and possibility, as well as regularity and constraint. The framework proposes a search for basic parameters to help therapists think comparatively and pluralistically about families' cultural configurations and meanings. Further, the parameters chosen--ecological context, migration/acculturation, organization, and life cycle--are used to heighten therapists' awareness about the "situated knowledge" of their own professional and personal culture. This approach recognizes the potential complexity of both the family's and the therapist's cultural location or ecological niche, and encourages curiosity in the therapeutic conversation rather than reliance on potentially stereotyping, ethnic-focused information.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Family Process
                Family Process
                Wiley-Blackwell
                0014-7370
                1545-5300
                March 2003
                March 2003
                : 42
                : 1
                : 1-18
                Article
                10.1111/j.1545-5300.2003.00001.x
                12698595
                01ab4faf-6e28-40a8-b050-94aec8d05b7d
                © 2003

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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