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      Association of rheumatoid arthritis and primary osteoarthritis with changes in the glycosylation pattern of total serum IgG

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          Abstract

          Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a widely prevalent (1-3%) chronic systemic disease thought to have an autoimmune component; both humoral and cellular mechanisms have been implicated. Primary osteoarthritis (OA) is considered to be distinct from rheumatoid arthritis, and here damage is thought to be secondary to cartilage degeneration. In rheumatoid arthritis, immune complexes are present that consist exclusively of immunoglobulin, implying that this is both the 'antibody' (rheumatoid factor [RF]) and the 'antigen' (most commonly IgG). Autoantigenic reactivity has been localized to the constant-region (C gamma 2) domains of IgG. There is no evidence for a polypeptide determinant but carbohydrate changes have been reported. We have therefore conducted a study, simultaneously in Oxford and Tokyo, to compare in detail the N-glycosylation pattern of serum IgG (Fig. 1) isolated from normal individuals and from patients with either primary osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. The results, which required an evaluation of the primary sequences of approximately 1,400 oligosaccharides from 46 IgG samples, indicate that: (1) IgG isolated from normal individuals, patients with RA and patients with OA contains different distributions of asparagine-linked bi-antennary complex-type oligosaccharide structures, (2) in neither disease is the IgG associated with novel oligosaccharide structures, but the observed differences are due to changes in the relative extent of galactosylation compared with normal individuals. This change results in a 'shift' in the population of IgG molecules towards those carrying complex oligosaccharides, one or both of whose arms terminate in N-acetylglucosamine. These two arthritides may therefore be glycosylation diseases, reflecting changes in the intracellular processing, or post-secretory degradation of N-linked oligosaccharides.

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          Most cited references21

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          Evidence in support of a self-perpetuating HLA-DR-dependent delayed-type cell reaction in rheumatoid arthritis.

          Originating from observations on similarities between the rheumatoid synovial tissue and skin lesions in delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions--similarities as to massive infiltrates of "helper" T lymphocytes close to HLA-DR-expressing macrophage/dendritic cells--a notion is formed on the importance of local macrophage-dependent helper T-cell activation in the rheumatoid joint similar to that in a delayed-type skin reaction. In vitro studies on suspended synovial cells have been used to test and qualify these ideas. It is shown that (i) HLA-DR-expressing cells in normal synovial intima can, like epidermal Langerhans cells, mediate T-cell activation; (ii) the large numbers of rheumatoid synovial HLA-DR-expressing macrophage-like/dendritic cells are heterogeneous and mediate either efficient activation or suppression of T-lymphocyte proliferation, and (iii) specificity of rheumatoid T cells can be analyzed with the help of autologous synovial antigen-presenting cells; a specific anti-collagen type II response is reported in three patients.
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            [17] Hydrazinolysis of asparagine-linked sugar chains to produce free oligosaccharides

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              The three-dimensional structure of the carbohydrate within the Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                August 1985
                August 1985
                : 316
                : 6027
                : 452-457
                Article
                10.1038/316452a0
                3927174
                01fcd77e-ac30-4b6a-aff9-83ca2e9f1cbb
                © 1985

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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