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      Reducing noise damage by using a mid-frequency sound conditioning stimulus.

      Neuroreport

      Acoustic Stimulation, Animals, Auditory Pathways, physiopathology, Conditioning (Psychology), physiology, Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem, Guinea Pigs, Hair Cells, Auditory, pathology, Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced, prevention & control

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          Abstract

          Sound conditioning guinea pigs to a 6.3 kHz tone at 78 dB SPL for either 13 or 24 days provides significant physiological (auditory brain stem responses, ABR; and distortion product otoacoustic emissions, DPOAE) and morphological (cochleograms) protection against a subsequent traumatic exposure (6.3 kHz, 100 dB SPL for 24 h) delivered 2 h after sound conditioning. Threshold shifts (ABR, DPOAE) were significantly reduced and the degree of hair cell loss was minimal. When a 1 week pause was given between the end of the sound conditioning and the traumatic exposure, protection was still observed, but to a lesser degree. These findings demonstrate that mid-frequency sound conditioning protects against noise trauma and that the protective effect is maintained for at least 1 week.

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          9507967

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