0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Update on the guideline of guidelines: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer : Update on NMIBC guideline of guidelines

      1 , 1 , 1

      BJU International

      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 50

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Association between smoking and risk of bladder cancer among men and women.

          Previous studies indicate that the population attributable risk (PAR) of bladder cancer for tobacco smoking is 50% to 65% in men and 20% to 30% in women and that current cigarette smoking triples bladder cancer risk relative to never smoking. During the last 30 years, incidence rates have remained stable in the United States in men (123.8 per 100,000 person-years to 142.2 per 100,000 person-years) and women (32.5 per 100,000 person-years to 33.2 per 100,000 person-years); however, changing smoking prevalence and cigarette composition warrant revisiting risk estimates for smoking and bladder cancer. To evaluate the association between tobacco smoking and bladder cancer. Men (n = 281,394) and women (n = 186,134) of the National Institutes of Health-AARP (NIH-AARP) Diet and Health Study cohort completed a lifestyle questionnaire and were followed up between October 25, 1995, and December 31, 2006. Previous prospective cohort studies of smoking and incident bladder cancer were identified by systematic review and relative risks were estimated from fixed-effects models with heterogeneity assessed by the I(2) statistic. Hazard ratios (HRs), PARs, and number needed to harm (NNH). During 4,518,941 person-years of follow-up, incident bladder cancer occurred in 3896 men (144.0 per 100,000 person-years) and 627 women (34.5 per 100,000 person-years). Former smokers (119.8 per 100,000 person-years; HR, 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03-2.44; NNH, 1250) and current smokers (177.3 per 100,000 person-years; HR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.66-4.50; NNH, 727) had higher risks of bladder cancer than never smokers (39.8 per 100,000 person-years). In contrast, the summary risk estimate for current smoking in 7 previous studies (initiated between 1963 and 1987) was 2.94 (95% CI, 2.45-3.54; I(2) = 0.0%). The PAR for ever smoking in our study was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.45-0.54) in men and 0.52 (95% CI, 0.45-0.59) in women. Compared with a pooled estimate of US data from cohorts initiated between 1963 and 1987, relative risks for smoking in the more recent NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort were higher, with PARs for women comparable with those for men.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: AUA/SUO Guideline.

            Although associated with an overall favorable survival rate, the heterogeneity of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) affects patients' rates of recurrence and progression. Risk stratification should influence evaluation, treatment and surveillance. This guideline attempts to provide a clinical framework for the management of NMIBC.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Recurrence and progression of disease in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: from epidemiology to treatment strategy.

              This review focuses on the prediction of recurrence and progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and the treatments advocated for this disease. To review the current status of epidemiology, recurrence, and progression of NMIBC and the state-of-the art treatment for this disease. A literature search in English was performed using PubMed and the guidelines of the European Association of Urology and the American Urological Association. Relevant papers on epidemiology, recurrence, progression, and management of NMIBC were selected. Special attention was given to fluorescent cystoscopy, the new World Health Organisation 2004 classification system for grade, and the role of substaging of T1 NMIBC. In NMIBC, approximately 70% of patients present as pTa, 20% as pT1, and 10% with carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesions. Bladder cancer (BCa) is the fifth most frequent type of cancer in western society and the most expensive cancer per patient. Recurrence (in < or = 80% of patients) is the main problem for pTa NMIBC patients, whereas progression (in < or = 45% of patients) is the main threat in pT1 and CIS NMIBC. In a recent European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer analysis, multiplicity, tumour size, and prior recurrence rate are the most important variables for recurrence. Tumour grade, stage, and CIS are the most important variables for progression. Treatment ranges from transurethral resection (TUR) followed by a single chemotherapy instillation in low-risk NMIBC to, sometimes, re-TUR and adjuvant intravesical therapy in intermediate- and high-risk patients to early cystectomy for treatment-refractory high-risk NMIBC. NMIBC is a heterogeneous disease with varying therapies, follow-up strategies, and oncologic outcomes for an individual patient.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                BJU
                BJU International
                BJU Int
                Wiley
                14644096
                February 2020
                February 2020
                November 01 2019
                : 125
                : 2
                : 197-205
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Urology; NYU Langone Health; New York NY USA
                Article
                10.1111/bju.14915
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article