Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Cognition About the Creative Process – Interview With Dr Andrew P. Allen

      * , a , b

      Europe's Journal of Psychology

      PsychOpen

      creativity, consciousness, learning, phenomenology, mindfulness

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          What is the relationship between the creative process and cognition and perception? Lynda Loughnane, a master’s student in Art and Process in Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork, Ireland interviewed Dr Andrew P. Allen about the subject. Areas covered include mindfulness, Type 1 and Type 2 thinking, stage theories of creativity, engagement with the art process and the artwork, phenomenology and consciousness with and without self report. The interview was constructed to cover a wide range of subject matter, so as to gather as much information as possible in layman's language about the cognitive process in relation to creativity and interaction with art.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 7

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The empirical case for two systems of reasoning.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The neuroscience of mindfulness meditation.

            Research over the past two decades broadly supports the claim that mindfulness meditation - practiced widely for the reduction of stress and promotion of health - exerts beneficial effects on physical and mental health, and cognitive performance. Recent neuroimaging studies have begun to uncover the brain areas and networks that mediate these positive effects. However, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear, and it is apparent that more methodologically rigorous studies are required if we are to gain a full understanding of the neuronal and molecular bases of the changes in the brain that accompany mindfulness meditation.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Collective unconscious: how gut microbes shape human behavior.

              The human gut harbors a dynamic and complex microbial ecosystem, consisting of approximately 1 kg of bacteria in the average adult, approximately the weight of the human brain. The evolutionary formation of a complex gut microbiota in mammals has played an important role in enabling brain development and perhaps sophisticated social interaction. Genes within the human gut microbiota, termed the microbiome, significantly outnumber human genes in the body, and are capable of producing a myriad of neuroactive compounds. Gut microbes are part of the unconscious system regulating behavior. Recent investigations indicate that these microbes majorly impact on cognitive function and fundamental behavior patterns, such as social interaction and stress management. In the absence of microbes, underlying neurochemistry is profoundly altered. Studies of gut microbes may play an important role in advancing understanding of disorders of cognitive functioning and social interaction, such as autism.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [a ]University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
                [b ]Crawford College of Art and Design, CIT, Cork, Ireland
                Author notes
                [* ]Department Psychiatry & Neurobehavioural Science/APC Microbiome Institute, Neurogastroenterology lab, Biosciences Building, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. andrewallen@ 123456ucc.ie
                153 Pearse Road, Ballyphehane, Cork city, Ireland. lynda.loughnane@ 123456mycit.ie
                Journal
                Eur J Psychol
                Eur J Psychol
                EJOP
                Europe's Journal of Psychology
                PsychOpen
                1841-0413
                November 2016
                18 November 2016
                : 12
                : 4
                : 679-686
                ejop.v12i4.1323
                10.5964/ejop.v12i4.1323
                5114880

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Interview

                Comments

                Comment on this article