Blog
About

29
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Design and Anticipated Outcomes of the eMERGE-PGx Project: A Multi-Center Pilot for Pre-Emptive Pharmacogenomics in Electronic Health Record Systems

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 2 , 5 , 6 , 6 , 7 , 4 , 3 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 3 , 7 , 11 , 12 , 13 , 10 , 14 , 14 , 15 , 13 , 16 , 17 , 23 , 7 , 1 , 18 , 19 , 23 , 20 , 14 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 11 , 13 , 24 , 10 , 14 , 25 , 26 , 23 , 27 , 28 , 4 , 13 , 24 , 29 , 30 , 9 , 7 , 11 , 31 , 3 , 32 , 33 , 34 , 16 , 35

      Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics

      pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics, next generation sequencing, study design, pre-emptive genotyping

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We describe here the design and initial implementation of the eMERGE-PGx project. eMERGE-PGx, a partnership of the eMERGE and PGRN consortia, has three objectives : 1) Deploy PGRNseq, a next-generation sequencing platform assessing sequence variation in 84 proposed pharmacogenes, in nearly 9,000 patients likely to be prescribed drugs of interest in a 1–3 year timeframe across several clinical sites; 2) Integrate well-established clinically-validated pharmacogenetic genotypes into the electronic health record with associated clinical decision support and assess process and clinical outcomes of implementation; and 3) Develop a repository of pharmacogenetic variants of unknown significance linked to a repository of EHR-based clinical phenotype data for ongoing pharmacogenomics discovery. We describe site-specific project implementation and anticipated products, including genetic variant and phenotype data repositories, novel variant association studies, clinical decision support modules, clinical and process outcomes, approaches to manage incidental findings, and patient and clinician education methods.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 38

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The path to personalized medicine.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Charting a course for genomic medicine from base pairs to bedside.

             D. Green,  ,  S Guyer (2011)
            There has been much progress in genomics in the ten years since a draft sequence of the human genome was published. Opportunities for understanding health and disease are now unprecedented, as advances in genomics are harnessed to obtain robust foundational knowledge about the structure and function of the human genome and about the genetic contributions to human health and disease. Here we articulate a 2011 vision for the future of genomics research and describe the path towards an era of genomic medicine.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              CPIC: Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium of the Pharmacogenomics Research Network.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                0372741
                3058
                Clin Pharmacol Ther
                Clin. Pharmacol. Ther.
                Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics
                0009-9236
                1532-6535
                24 June 2014
                24 June 2014
                October 2014
                01 October 2015
                : 96
                : 4
                : 482-489
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
                [2 ]Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research
                [3 ]Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington
                [4 ]Center for Applied Genomics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
                [5 ]Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic
                [6 ]Center for Human Genetics, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation
                [7 ]Group Health Research Institute
                [8 ]Center for Inherited Disease Research, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
                [9 ]Division of Medical Genetics, University of Washington
                [10 ]The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
                [11 ]Division of Genomic Medicine, National Human Genome Research Institute
                [12 ]Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation
                [13 ]Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children’s Hospital
                [14 ]Center for Genetic Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
                [15 ]Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic
                [16 ]Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
                [17 ]Division Human Genetics, Division Patient Services, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
                [18 ]Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University
                [19 ]Department of Anesthesia, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
                [20 ]Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
                [21 ]Mount Sinai Faculty Practice Associates Primary Care Program, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
                [22 ]Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
                [23 ]Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
                [24 ]Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School
                [25 ]Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905
                [26 ]Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
                [27 ]Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati
                [28 ]US Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
                [29 ]The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Boston Children’s Hospital
                [30 ]Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic
                [31 ]Essentia Institute of Rural Health, Duluth, MN
                [32 ]Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine
                [33 ]Genomic Medicine Institute, Geisinger Health System
                [34 ]Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
                [35 ]Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
                Author notes
                Contact information: Dr. Laura Rasmussen-Torvik, PhD, MPH, Department of Preventive Medicine, 680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60611, ljrtorvik@ 123456northwestern.edu , p. 312-503-3596, f. 312-908-9588
                Article
                NIHMS605974
                10.1038/clpt.2014.137
                4169732
                24960519
                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article