1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Pain Control with Splanchnic Neurolysis in Pancreatic Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Celiac Plexus Neurolysis

      1

      Journal of Pain Research

      Dove

      pancreatic cancer, pain control, splanchnic neurolysis, celiac plexus neurolysis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background/Aims

          In most instances of abdominal pain associated with pancreatic cancer, pain may become refractory to increasing doses of narcotics. Celiac plexus neurolysis represents an option; however, altered celiac plexus anatomy may render this treatment infeasible or ineffective, where splanchnic nerve neurolysis may represent another option. This study aimed to investigate the outcomes of splanchnic neurolysis in pancreatic cancer patients not responsive to celiac plexus neurolysis.

          Patients and Methods

          Among all 84 patients who underwent celiac plexus neurolysis for pancreatic cancer pain during the study period, 34 patients did not respond and underwent splanchnic nerve neurolysis under fluoroscopic guidance and thus included in this retrospective study. Stage IV, III, and II disease was present in 38.2%, 47.1%, and 14.7% of the patients. During the study, 88.2% were receiving chemotherapy, whereas none were on radiotherapy. Data for daily narcotic dose equivalents and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores during outpatient visits at baseline, 2 weeks, 2 months, and 3 months were extracted.

          Results

          Pain response rates were 76.5%, 84.4%, and 71.0%, at 2 weeks, 2 months, and 3 months, respectively. A significant and dramatic reduction was seen in VAS scores at 2 weeks (2.8±1.2 versus 6.3±1.1, p<0.001), and this significant decline was maintained for 3 months. Similarly, a significant and dramatic reduction was seen in daily narcotic need at 2 weeks (20.8±32.9 versus 93.4±86.2 mg, p<0.001), which was also maintained during the 3-month follow-up. The procedure was generally well tolerated.

          Conclusion

          Findings of this study suggest that splanchnic neurolysis represents a durable and effective option for pain control in pancreatic cancer patients in whom the neurolysis of the celiac plexus is ineffective. However, these conclusions refer to only preliminary single-center results in a selected patient group; thus, further large studies are warranted.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 41

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Development of the Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire to assess pain in cancer and other diseases.

          This paper reports the development of a self-report instrument designed to assess pain in cancer and other diseases. It is argued that issues of reliability and validity should be considered for every pain questionnaire. Most research on measures of pain examine reliability to the relative neglect of validity concerns. The Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire (BPQ) is evaluated with regard to both reliability and validity. Data from patients with cancer at 4 primary sites and from patients with rheumatoid arthritis suggest that the BPQ is sufficiently reliable and valid for research purposes. Additional methodological and theoretical issues related to validity are discussed, and the need for continuing evaluation of the BPQ and other measures of clinical pain is stressed.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Chemical splanchnicectomy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. A prospective randomized trial.

            A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was completed comparing intraoperative chemical splanchnicectomy with 50% alcohol versus a placebo injection of saline in patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreatic cancer. Standardized assessment of pain, mood, and disability due to pain was completed preoperatively and at 2-month intervals until death. Chemical splanchnicectomy with alcohol was performed in 65 patients, whereas 72 patients received the placebo. The two groups were similar with respect to age, sex, location, and stage of tumor, operation performed, the use of postoperative chemo- and radiation therapy, and initial assessment scores for pain, mood, and disability. No differences in hospital mortality or complications, return to oral intake, or length of hospital stay were observed. Mean pain scores were significantly lower in the alcohol group at 2-, 4-, and 6-month follow-up and at the final assessment (p < 0.05). To further determine the effect of chemical splanchnicectomy, patients were stratified into those with and without preoperative pain. In patients without preoperative pain, alcohol significantly reduced pain scores and delayed or prevented the subsequent onset of pain (p < 0.05). In patients with significant preoperative pain, alcohol significantly reduced existing pain (p < 0.05). Furthermore, patients with preexisting pain who received alcohol showed a significant improvement in survival when compared with controls (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that intraoperative chemical splanchnicectomy with alcohol significantly reduces or prevents pain in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Neurolytic celiac plexus block for treatment of cancer pain: a meta-analysis.

              We performed a meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) for cancer pain. A literature search yielded 59 papers, but data on NCPB in two or more patients was available in only 24 papers. Twenty-one studies were retrospective, one was prospective, and two were randomized and controlled. Cancer type was stated in 1117 of 1145 patients reported (63% pancreatic, 37% nonpancreatic). A bilateral posterior approach with 15-50 mL [corrected] of 50%-100% alcohol was the most common technique. Nonradiologically guided NCPB was performed in 246 patients (32%); guidance was by computed tomography (CT) in 214 (28%), radiograph in 271 (34%), fluoroscopy in 36 (5%), or ultrasound in 7 (< 1%). Good to excellent pain relief was reported in 878/989 patients (89%) during the first 2 wk after NCPB. Long-term followup beyond 3 mo revealed persistent benefit. Partial to complete pain relief continued in approximately 90% of patients alive at 3 mo post-NCPB and in 70%-90% until death even if beyond 3 mo post-NCPB. Patients with pancreatic cancer responded similarly to those with other intraabdominal malignancies. Common adverse effects were transient, including local pain (96%), diarrhea (44%), and hypotension (38%); complications occurred in 2%. This analysis suggests that: 1) NCPB has long-lasting benefit for 70%-90% of patients with pancreatic and other intraabdominal cancers, regardless of the technique used; 2) adverse effects are common but transient and mild; and 3) severe adverse effects are uncommon.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                jpr
                jpainres
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove
                1178-7090
                12 August 2020
                2020
                : 13
                : 2023-2031
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Gayrettepe Florence Nightingale Hospital , Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Istanbul, Besiktas 34349, Turkey
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Savas Comlek Gayrettepe Florence Nightingale Hospital , Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Istanbul, Besiktas34349, TurkeyTel +90 532 4273310 Email savatc@gmail.com
                Article
                266689
                10.2147/JPR.S266689
                7429208
                © 2020 Comlek.

                This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms ( https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 2, References: 50, Pages: 9
                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article