5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Diabetic ketoacidosis among adult patients with diabetes mellitus admitted to emergency unit of Hawassa university comprehensive specialized hospital

      brief-report

      , , ,

      BMC Research Notes

      BioMed Central

      Diabetic ketoacidosis, Diabetes, Hawassa, Prevalence

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          This study was aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of diabetic ketoacidosis among adult patients admitted in emergency department of Hawassa university comprehensive specialized hospital. An institution based retrospective cross-sectional study design was conducted among 195 adult patients aged 16 years and above with known or previously unknown diabetes cases presented in the emergency unit.

          Result

          In our study from the total 195 patients medical record reviewed 78 (40%) developed DKA. Out of the total reviewed medical record 55 (28.2%) and 23 (11.8%) were with type-1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus respectively. From acute complication of diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis was a leading cause 78 (77%) followed by hypoglycemia 14 (14%) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (9%). During multiple logistic regression analysis age and hypertension were found to have significant association with diabetic ketoacidosis.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (10.1186/s13104-019-4186-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2014. Definition, epidemiology, and classification of diabetes in children and adolescents.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Factors associated with the presence of diabetic ketoacidosis at diagnosis of diabetes in children and young adults: a systematic review

            Objective To identify the factors associated with diabetic ketoacidosis at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Design Systematic review. Data sources PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cinahl and article reference lists. Study selection Cohort studies including unselected groups of children and young adults presenting with new onset type 1 diabetes that distinguished between those who presented in diabetic ketoacidosis and those who did not and included a measurement of either pH or bicarbonate in the definition of diabetic ketoacidosis. There were no restrictions on language of publication. Results 46 studies involving more than 24 000 children in 31 countries were included. Together they compared 23 different factors. Factors associated with increased risk were younger age (for <2 years old v older, odds ratio 3.41 (95% confidence interval 2.54 to 4.59), for <5 years v older, odds ratio 1.59 (1.38 to 1.84)), diagnostic error (odds ratio 3.35 (2.35 to 4.79)), ethnic minority, lack of health insurance in the US (odds ratio 3.20 (2.03 to 5.04)), lower body mass index, preceding infection (odds ratio 3.14 (0.94 to 10.47)), and delayed treatment (odds ratio 1.74 (1.10 to 2.77)). Protective factors were having a first degree relative with type 1 diabetes at the time of diagnosis (odds ratio 0.33 (0.08 to 1.26)), higher parental education (odds ratios 0.4 (0.20 to 0.79) and 0.64 (0.43 to 0.94) in two studies), and higher background incidence of type 1 diabetes (correlation coefficient –0.715). The mean duration of symptoms was similar between children presenting with or without diabetic ketoacidosis (16.5 days (standard error 6.2) and 17.1 days (6.0) respectively), and up to 38.8% (285/735) of children who presented with diabetic ketoacidosis had been seen at least once by a doctor before diagnosis. Conclusions Multiple factors affect the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis at the onset of type 1 diabetes in children and young adults, and there is potential time, scope, and opportunity to intervene between symptom onset and development of diabetic ketoacidosis for both parents and clinicians.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence of hypertension and diabetes among Ethiopian adults.

              To determine the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes among members of an Ethiopian occupational cohort; and to examine the proportion of adults who were aware of their conditions. A total of 2153 of subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. The World Health Organization STEPwise approach for non-communicable diseases was used to collect socio-demographic data, blood pressure measures and blood samples from participants. Prevalence estimates for hypertension and diabetes were determined separately. The 95% confidence intervals for prevalence estimates were also determined. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 19.1% (95%CI: 17.1-20.8) and 22% (95%CI: 20.2-23.8) and 14.9% (95%CI: 13.4-16.4) among men and women respectively. The overall prevalence of diabetes was 6.5% (95%CI: 5.4-7.6) and 6.4% (95%CI: 5.0-7.8) and 6.6% (95%CI: 4.8-8.4) among men and women correspondingly. Notably, 15% of hypertensives reported never having had their blood pressure checked prior to the present study examination. Approximately 45% of participants who had their blood pressure checked were never diagnosed with hypertension, but were found to be hypertensive in our study. Approximately 27% of newly diagnosed diabetics (during this study) reported never having a previous blood glucose test. Among those who had their blood glucose assessed prior to this study, 17.4% were found to have diabetes but were never diagnosed. The high prevalence of hypertension and diabetes reported in our study confirms findings from other Sub-Saharan Africa countries, and extends the literature to urban dwelling Ethiopians where non-communicable diseases are emerging as a major public health concern. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                asresbedaso@gmail.com
                oltayezewdie@yahoo.com
                ephi.geja@gmail.com
                mameayale@gmail.com
                Journal
                BMC Res Notes
                BMC Res Notes
                BMC Research Notes
                BioMed Central (London )
                1756-0500
                14 March 2019
                14 March 2019
                2019
                : 12
                Affiliations
                ISNI 0000 0000 8953 2273, GRID grid.192268.6, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Nursing, , Hawassa University, ; P.O.BOX: 1560, Hawassa, SNNPR Ethiopia
                Article
                4186
                10.1186/s13104-019-4186-3
                6419397
                30871605
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Categories
                Research Note
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Medicine

                diabetic ketoacidosis, diabetes, hawassa, prevalence

                Comments

                Comment on this article