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      Neuropeptide Y Suppresses Anorexigenic Output from the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

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          Abstract

          Output from the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN) is anorexigenic and is supported by the excitatory actions of leptin. The VMN is also highly sensitive to the orexigenic actions of Neuropeptide Y (NPY). We report that NPY robustly inhibits VMN neurons by hyperpolarizing them and decreasing their ability to fire action potentials. This action was mediated by Y 1 receptors coupled to the activation of GIRKs (G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels). Approximately 80% of VMN neurons expressing leptin receptors were sensitive to the actions of NPY, whereas 75% of NPY-sensitive neurons in VMN also responded to glucose by being uniformly inhibited by elevations in glucose. Interestingly, only ∼36% of NPY-sensitive, leptin receptor b-expressing neurons were also glucosensitive. We suggest that NPY inhibits VMN neurons that are excited by leptin, thereby arresting the anorexigenic tone exerted by VMN neurons. The results further suggest a dynamic interplay between anorexigenic and orexigenic neuromodulators within the VMN to directly affect energy balance.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Neurosci
          J. Neurosci
          jneuro
          jneurosci
          J. Neurosci
          The Journal of Neuroscience
          Society for Neuroscience
          0270-6474
          1529-2401
          3 March 2010
          : 30
          : 9
          : 3380-3390
          Affiliations
          1Centre for Neuroscience and
          2Department of Pharmacology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7, Canada, and
          3Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
          Author notes
          Correspondence should be addressed to William F. Colmers, Department of Pharmacology, University of Alberta, 9-36 Medical Science Building, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H7, Canada. william.colmers@ 123456ualberta.ca
          Article
          PMC6634086 PMC6634086 6634086 3575764
          10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4031-09.2010
          6634086
          20203197
          Copyright © 2010 the authors 0270-6474/10/303380-11$15.00/0
          Categories
          Articles
          Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive

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