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      Associations of Micro-Albuminuria with Intra-Uterine Growth Retardation

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          Abstract

          Background/Aim: Micro-albuminuria is associated with insulin resistance and a high blood pressure and predicts an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in both diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Relationships have been described for micro-albuminuria with both low birth weight and short stature in adulthood. We have tested the hypothesis that micro-albuminuria in non-diabetic adults may be associated with markers of intra-uterine growth retardation. Methods: We measured the urinary albumin excretion rate in 818 men and women from three populations, in whom detailed records of birth weight were available, of whom 354 had records of length at birth to provide an estimate of the ponderal index. Results: The albumin excretion rates were higher in men than in women (5.1 vs. 3.8 µg/min) and were related to age (r = 0.23, p < 0.001) and body mass index (r = 0.08, p = 0.02) as well as fasting plasma glucose and blood pressure. Considered as a continuous variable, the albumin excretion rate was not related to any measure of size at birth or to adult height. Fifty-four subjects (6.6%) were micro-albuminuric (albumin excretion rate ≧ 20 µg/ min), and these subjects were thinner at birth than normo-albuminuric subjects (12.9 vs. 13.8 oz/in<sup>3</sup>, p = 0.09). Compared to those subjects whose ponderal index had been in the upper third of the distribution, people whose ponderal index had been in the lower third of the distribution had an odds ratio for micro-albuminuria of 3.1 (p for trend 0.05). Conclusion: The association between micro-albuminuria, insulin resistance, and coronary heart disease may be a consequence of growth retardation representing a common antecedent.

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          Can we really grow new blood vessels?

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            Is There an Association between Glomerular Density and Birth Weight in Healthy Humans?

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              Author and article information

              Journal
              NEF
              Nephron
              10.1159/issn.1660-8151
              Nephron
              S. Karger AG
              1660-8151
              2235-3186
              2001
              2001
              10 October 2001
              : 89
              : 3
              : 309-314
              Affiliations
              aUniversity College London and bMedical Research Council Environmental Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, UK
              Article
              46091 Nephron 2001;89:309–314
              10.1159/000046091
              11598395
              © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

              Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

              Page count
              Tables: 3, References: 40, Pages: 6
              Product
              Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46091
              Categories
              Original Paper

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