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      Plasma Dimethylarginine Levels in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients Are Independent of the Type of Dialyzer Applied

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          Most cited references 31

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          Nitric oxide synthase: role in the genesis of vascular disease.

          The product of nitric oxide (NO) synthase is the most potent endogenous vasodilator known. No not only is a potent vasodilator, it also inhibits platelet adherence and aggregation, reduces adherence of leukocytes to the endothelium, and suppresses proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. A number of disorders are associated with reduced synthesis and/or increased degradation of vascular NO. These include hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and tobacco use. The endothelial dysfunction caused by these disorders contributes to the alterations in vascular function and structure observed in these conditions. A reduction in the activity of vascular NO likely plays a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. Insights into the mechanisms by which NO production or activity is altered in these states will lead to new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of a number of vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, and thrombosis.
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            Plasma concentration of asymmetrical dimethylarginine and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease: a prospective study

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              Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: epidemiology, cardiovascular outcomes, and clinical prediction rules.

              Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is the most common primary disease of the renal arteries, and it is associated with two major clinical syndromes, ischemic renal disease and hypertension. The prevalence of this disease in the population is undefined because there is no simple and reliable test that can be applied on a large scale. Renal artery involvement in patients with coronary heart disease and/or heart failure is frequent, and it may influence cardiovascular outcomes and survival in these patients. Suspecting renal arterial stenosis in patients with recurrent episodes of pulmonary edema is justified by observations showing that about one third of elderly patients with heart failure display atherosclerotic renal disease. Whether interventions aimed at restoring arterial patency may reduce the high mortality in patients with heart failure is still unclear because, to date, no prospective study has been carried out in these patients. Increased awareness of the need for cost containment has renewed the interest in clinical cues for suspecting renovascular hypertension. In this regard, the DRASTIC study constitutes an important attempt at validating clinical prediction rules. In this study, a clinical rule was derived that predicted renal artery stenosis as efficiently as renal scintigraphy (sensitivity: clinical rule, 65% versus scintigraphy, 72%; specificity: 87% versus 92%). When tested in a systematic and quantitative manner, clinical findings can perform as accurately as more complex tests in the detection of renal artery stenosis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BPU
                Blood Purif
                10.1159/issn.0253-5068
                Blood Purification
                S. Karger AG
                0253-5068
                1421-9735
                2007
                July 2007
                02 July 2007
                : 25
                : 3
                : 281-289
                Affiliations
                Departments of aNephrology, bClinical Chemistry, and cClinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and dInstitute for Cardiovascular Research VU (ICaR-VU), VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, and eDepartment of Internal Medicine, Medical Centre Alkmaar,Alkmaar, The Netherlands
                Article
                104868 Blood Purif 2007;25:281–289
                10.1159/000104868
                17622710
                © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 9
                Categories
                Original Paper

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