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      RNA-Seq Assembly – Are We There Yet?

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          Abstract

          Transcriptomic sequence resources represent invaluable assets for research, in particular for non-model species without a sequenced genome. To date, the Next Generation Sequencing technologies 454/Roche and Illumina have been used to generate transcriptome sequence databases by mRNA-Seq for more than fifty different plant species. While some of the databases were successfully used for downstream applications, such as proteomics, the assembly parameters indicate that the assemblies do not yet accurately reflect the actual plant transcriptomes. Two different assembly strategies have been used, overlap consensus based assemblers for long reads and Eulerian path/de Bruijn graph assembler for short reads. In this review, we discuss the challenges and solutions to the transcriptome assembly problem. A list of quality control parameters and the necessary scripts to produce them are provided.

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          Most cited references 73

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          Trinity: reconstructing a full-length transcriptome without a genome from RNA-Seq data

          Massively-parallel cDNA sequencing has opened the way to deep and efficient probing of transcriptomes. Current approaches for transcript reconstruction from such data often rely on aligning reads to a reference genome, and are thus unsuitable for samples with a partial or missing reference genome. Here, we present the Trinity methodology for de novo full-length transcriptome reconstruction, and evaluate it on samples from fission yeast, mouse, and whitefly – an insect whose genome has not yet been sequenced. Trinity fully reconstructs a large fraction of the transcripts present in the data, also reporting alternative splice isoforms and transcripts from recently duplicated genes. In all cases, Trinity performs better than other available de novo transcriptome assembly programs, and its sensitivity is comparable to methods relying on genome alignments. Our approach provides a unified and general solution for transcriptome reconstruction in any sample, especially in the complete absence of a reference genome.
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            Velvet: algorithms for de novo short read assembly using de Bruijn graphs.

            We have developed a new set of algorithms, collectively called "Velvet," to manipulate de Bruijn graphs for genomic sequence assembly. A de Bruijn graph is a compact representation based on short words (k-mers) that is ideal for high coverage, very short read (25-50 bp) data sets. Applying Velvet to very short reads and paired-ends information only, one can produce contigs of significant length, up to 50-kb N50 length in simulations of prokaryotic data and 3-kb N50 on simulated mammalian BACs. When applied to real Solexa data sets without read pairs, Velvet generated contigs of approximately 8 kb in a prokaryote and 2 kb in a mammalian BAC, in close agreement with our simulated results without read-pair information. Velvet represents a new approach to assembly that can leverage very short reads in combination with read pairs to produce useful assemblies.
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              Sequencing technologies - the next generation.

              Demand has never been greater for revolutionary technologies that deliver fast, inexpensive and accurate genome information. This challenge has catalysed the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. The inexpensive production of large volumes of sequence data is the primary advantage over conventional methods. Here, I present a technical review of template preparation, sequencing and imaging, genome alignment and assembly approaches, and recent advances in current and near-term commercially available NGS instruments. I also outline the broad range of applications for NGS technologies, in addition to providing guidelines for platform selection to address biological questions of interest.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Front Plant Sci
                Front Plant Sci
                Front. Plant Sci.
                Frontiers in Plant Science
                Frontiers Research Foundation
                1664-462X
                25 September 2012
                2012
                : 3
                10.3389/fpls.2012.00220
                3457010
                23056003
                Copyright © 2012 Schliesky, Gowik, Weber and Bräutigam.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.

                Counts
                Figures: 2, Tables: 2, Equations: 0, References: 74, Pages: 12, Words: 10797
                Categories
                Plant Science
                Review Article

                Plant science & Botany

                transcriptome, rna-seq, ngs, next generation sequencing, assembly, plant

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