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      Conversation Cafés and Conceptual Framework Formation for Research Training and Mentoring of Underrepresented Faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Obesity Health Disparities (OHD) PRIDE Program

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      Ethnicity & Disease

      Ethnicity and Disease Inc

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          Abstract

          The development of research training opportunities for investigators from the untapped pool of traditionally underrep­resented racial/ethnic groups has gained intense interest at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The significant and persistent disparity in the likelihood of R01 funding between African American and Whites was highlighted in the groundbreaking 2011 report, Race, Ethnicity, and NIH Research Awards. Disparities in funding success were also shown to exist at the institutional level, as 30 institutions receive a disproportion­ate share of federal research funding. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have a dual commitment to edu­cation and research; however, the teaching loads at HBCUs may present challenges for research-oriented faculty. Few research training and mentoring programs have been specifically designed for this group.During 2015 and 2016, we held three conversation cafés with 77 participants in Jackson, Mississippi and Baltimore, Maryland. The purpose of this article is to describe findings from these conversation cafés regarding barriers and facilitators to building robust research careers at HBCUs, and to illustrate how these data were used to adapt the conceptual framework for the NHLBI-funded Obesity Health Disparities (OHD) PRIDE program. Identified barri­ers included teaching and advising loads, infrastructures, and lack of research mentors on campus. The benefit of incorporating re­search into classroom teaching was a noted facilitator. Ethn Dis. 2020;30(1):83-90; doi:10.18865/ed.30.1.83

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Ethnicity & Disease
          Ethn Dis
          Ethnicity and Disease Inc
          1945-0826
          1049-510X
          January 16 2020
          January 16 2020
          : 30
          : 1
          : 83-90
          Article
          10.18865/ed.30.1.83
          6970518
          31969787
          © 2020

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