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      Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells: Rational for Use as a Neuroprotectant in Ischemic Brain Disease

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          Abstract

          The use of stem cells for reparative medicine was first proposed more than three decades ago. Hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow, peripheral blood and human umbilical cord blood (CB) have gained major use for treatment of hematological indications. CB, however, is also a source of cells capable of differentiating into various non-hematopoietic cell types, including neural cells. Several animal model reports have shown that CB cells may be used for treatment of neurological injuries. This review summarizes the information available on the origin of CB-derived neuronal cells and the mechanisms proposed to explain their action. The potential use of stem/progenitor cells for treatment of ischemic brain injuries is discussed. Issues that remain to be resolved at the present stage of preclinical trials are addressed.

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          Most cited references 73

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          Intravenous administration of human umbilical cord blood reduces behavioral deficits after stroke in rats.

          Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC) are rich in stem and progenitor cells. In this study we tested whether intravenously infused HUCBC enter brain, survive, differentiate, and improve neurological functional recovery after stroke in rats. In addition, we tested whether ischemic brain tissue extract selectively induces chemotaxis of HUCBC in vitro. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to transient (2-hour) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Experimental groups were as follows: group 1, MCAO alone (n=5); group 2, 3x10(6) HUCBC injected into tail vein at 24 hours after MCAO (n=6) (animals of groups 1 and 2 were killed at 14 days after MCAO); group 3, MCAO alone (n=5); group 4, MCAO injected with PBS at 1 day after stroke (n=8); and group 5, 3x10(6) HUCBC injected into tail vein at 7 days after MCAO (n=5). Rats of groups 3, 4, and 5 were killed at 35 days after MCAO. Behavioral tests (rotarod and Modified Neurological Severity Score [mNSS]) were performed. Immunohistochemical staining was used to identify cells derived from HUCBC. Chemotactic activity of ischemia brain tissue extracts toward HUCBC at different time points was evaluated in vitro. Treatment at 24 hours after MCAO with HUCBC significantly improved functional recovery, as evidenced by the rotarod test and mNSS (P<0.05). Treatment at 7 days after MCAO with HUCBC significantly improved function only on the mNSS (P<0.05). Some HUCBC were reactive for the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein and the neuronal markers NeuN and microtubule-associated protein 2. In vitro, significant HUCBC migration activity was present at 24 hours after MCAO (P<0.01) compared with normal brain tissue. Intravenously administered HUCBC enter brain, survive, migrate, and improve functional recovery after stroke. HUCBC transplantation may provide a cell source to treat stroke.
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            A New Human Somatic Stem Cell from Placental Cord Blood with Intrinsic Pluripotent Differentiation Potential

            Here a new, intrinsically pluripotent, CD45-negative population from human cord blood, termed unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) is described. This rare population grows adherently and can be expanded to 1015 cells without losing pluripotency. In vitro USSCs showed homogeneous differentiation into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, and hematopoietic and neural cells including astrocytes and neurons that express neurofilament, sodium channel protein, and various neurotransmitter phenotypes. Stereotactic implantation of USSCs into intact adult rat brain revealed that human Tau-positive cells persisted for up to 3 mo and showed migratory activity and a typical neuron-like morphology. In vivo differentiation of USSCs along mesodermal and endodermal pathways was demonstrated in animal models. Bony reconstitution was observed after transplantation of USSC-loaded calcium phosphate cylinders in nude rat femurs. Chondrogenesis occurred after transplanting cell-loaded gelfoam sponges into nude mice. Transplantation of USSCs in a noninjury model, the preimmune fetal sheep, resulted in up to 5% human hematopoietic engraftment. More than 20% albumin-producing human parenchymal hepatic cells with absence of cell fusion and substantial numbers of human cardiomyocytes in both atria and ventricles of the sheep heart were detected many months after USSC transplantation. No tumor formation was observed in any of these animals.
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              Administration of CD34+ cells after stroke enhances neurogenesis via angiogenesis in a mouse model.

              Thrombo-occlusive cerebrovascular disease resulting in stroke and permanent neuronal loss is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Because of the unique properties of cerebral vasculature and the limited reparative capability of neuronal tissue, it has been difficult to devise effective neuroprotective therapies in cerebral ischemia. Our results demonstrate that systemic administration of human cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells to immunocompromised mice subjected to stroke 48 hours earlier induces neovascularization in the ischemic zone and provides a favorable environment for neuronal regeneration. Endogenous neurogenesis, suppressed by an antiangiogenic agent, is accelerated as a result of enhanced migration of neuronal progenitor cells to the damaged area, followed by their maturation and functional recovery. Our data suggest an essential role for CD34(+) cells in promoting directly or indirectly an environment conducive to neovascularization of ischemic brain so that neuronal regeneration can proceed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Mol Sci
                ijms
                International Journal of Molecular Sciences
                Molecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI)
                1422-0067
                2010
                21 September 2010
                : 11
                : 9
                : 3513-3528
                Affiliations
                [1 ] The School of Pharmacy Institute for Drug Research, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel; E-Mails: hadara@ 123456ekmd.huji.ac.il (H.A.-Z.); shimonl@ 123456ekmd.huji.ac.il (S.L.)
                [2 ] Division of Hematology and Cord Blood Bank, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel; E-Mail: arnon.nagler@ 123456sheba.health.gov.il (A.N.)
                Author notes
                * Author to whom correspondence should be addressed: E-Mail: philipl@ 123456ekmd.huji.ac.il ; Tel.: 972-2-6758-729; Fax: 972-2-6757-490.
                Article
                ijms-11-03513
                10.3390/ijms11093513
                2956109
                20957109
                © 2010 by the authors; licensee Molecular Diversity Preservation International, Basel, Switzerland.

                This article is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

                Categories
                Review

                Molecular biology

                human umbilical cord blood stem cells, neuroprotection, brain ischemia

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