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      Genome-wide Association of Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α DNA Binding with Expression Profiling of Hypoxia-inducible Transcripts*

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          Abstract

          Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) controls an extensive range of adaptive responses to hypoxia. To better understand this transcriptional cascade we performed genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation using antibodies to two major HIF-α subunits, and correlated the results with genome-wide transcript profiling. Within a tiled promoter array we identified 546 and 143 sequences that bound, respectively, to HIF-1α or HIF-2α at high stringency. Analysis of these sequences confirmed an identical core binding motif for HIF-1α and HIF-2α (RCGTG) but demonstrated that binding to this motif was highly selective, with binding enriched at distinct regions both upstream and downstream of the transcriptional start. Comparison of HIF-promoter binding data with bidirectional HIF-dependent changes in transcript expression indicated that whereas a substantial proportion of positive responses (>20% across all significantly regulated genes) are direct, HIF-dependent gene suppression is almost entirely indirect. Comparison of HIF-1α- versus HIF-2α-binding sites revealed that whereas some loci bound HIF-1α in isolation, many bound both isoforms with similar affinity. Despite high-affinity binding to multiple promoters, HIF-2α contributed to few, if any, of the transcriptional responses to acute hypoxia at these loci. Given emerging evidence for biologically distinct functions of HIF-1α versus HIF-2α understanding the mechanisms restricting HIF-2α activity will be of interest.

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          Most cited references 44

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          DAVID: Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery.

          Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes is a necessary and critical step in the analysis of microarray data. The distributed nature of biological knowledge frequently requires researchers to navigate through numerous web-accessible databases gathering information one gene at a time. A more judicious approach is to provide query-based access to an integrated database that disseminates biologically rich information across large datasets and displays graphic summaries of functional information. Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID; http://www.david.niaid.nih.gov) addresses this need via four web-based analysis modules: 1) Annotation Tool - rapidly appends descriptive data from several public databases to lists of genes; 2) GoCharts - assigns genes to Gene Ontology functional categories based on user selected classifications and term specificity level; 3) KeggCharts - assigns genes to KEGG metabolic processes and enables users to view genes in the context of biochemical pathway maps; and 4) DomainCharts - groups genes according to PFAM conserved protein domains. Analysis results and graphical displays remain dynamically linked to primary data and external data repositories, thereby furnishing in-depth as well as broad-based data coverage. The functionality provided by DAVID accelerates the analysis of genome-scale datasets by facilitating the transition from data collection to biological meaning.
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            Hypoxia signalling in cancer and approaches to enforce tumour regression.

            Tumour cells emerge as a result of genetic alteration of signal circuitries promoting cell growth and survival, whereas their expansion relies on nutrient supply. Oxygen limitation is central in controlling neovascularization, glucose metabolism, survival and tumour spread. This pleiotropic action is orchestrated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which is a master transcriptional factor in nutrient stress signalling. Understanding the role of HIF in intracellular pH (pH(i)) regulation, metabolism, cell invasion, autophagy and cell death is crucial for developing novel anticancer therapies. There are new approaches to enforce necrotic cell death and tumour regression by targeting tumour metabolism and pH(i)-control systems.
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              A microRNA signature of hypoxia.

              Recent research has identified critical roles for microRNAs in a large number of cellular processes, including tumorigenic transformation. While significant progress has been made towards understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation by microRNAs, much less is known about factors affecting the expression of these noncoding transcripts. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a functional link between hypoxia, a well-documented tumor microenvironment factor, and microRNA expression. Microarray-based expression profiles revealed that a specific spectrum of microRNAs (including miR-23, -24, -26, -27, -103, -107, -181, -210, and -213) is induced in response to low oxygen, at least some via a hypoxia-inducible-factor-dependent mechanism. Select members of this group (miR-26, -107, and -210) decrease proapoptotic signaling in a hypoxic environment, suggesting an impact of these transcripts on tumor formation. Interestingly, the vast majority of hypoxia-induced microRNAs are also overexpressed in a variety of human tumors.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Biol Chem
                jbc
                jbc
                JBC
                The Journal of Biological Chemistry
                American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814, U.S.A. )
                0021-9258
                1083-351X
                19 June 2009
                21 April 2009
                21 April 2009
                : 284
                : 25
                : 16767-16775
                Affiliations
                From the Henry Wellcome Building of Molecular Physiology and
                §The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, United Kingdom and the
                Renal Unit, Level 6, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia 5042, Australia
                Author notes
                1To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel.: 44-0-1865-287788; Fax: 44-0-1865-287787; E-mail: drmole@ 123456well.ox.ac.uk .
                Article
                M901790200
                10.1074/jbc.M901790200
                2719312
                19386601
                © 2009 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

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                Transcription, Chromatin, and Epigenetics

                Biochemistry

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