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      Roflumilast: a review of its use in the treatment of COPD

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          Abstract

          COPD is a progressive condition involving chronic inflammation and parenchymal destruction with resulting airflow limitation. COPD is associated with worsening airflow limitation over time and increased frequency of COPD exacerbations, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. The effects of COPD extend beyond the lungs, as multiple comorbidities may occur with COPD, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, depression, and pneumonia. COPD exacerbations are associated with a rapid worsening of baseline symptoms that requires prompt management and may necessitate hospitalization in the case of a severe episode. Patients with COPD exacerbations require urgent management of symptoms to prevent further worsening, and preventative steps may be taken to help reduce the number and frequency of future exacerbations. Roflumilast is a potent and selective inhibitor of the enzyme phosphodiesterase-4 that targets the systemic inflammation associated with COPD. Roflumilast has a variety of anti-inflammatory effects including decreasing inflammatory mediators and the expression of cell surface markers and inhibition of apoptosis. Several clinical trials evaluating roflumilast in the treatment of COPD have demonstrated significant improvements from baseline versus placebo in lung function, including increases in mean pre- and postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity. Data suggest that roflumilast reduces moderate to severe exacerbations with the benefit most well established in patients with severe disease. Given this evidence, roflumilast, as part of a combination regimen with long-acting bronchodilators, appears to be a reasonable treatment option for patients with severe to very severe COPD associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations.

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          Most cited references 44

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          Association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and systemic inflammation: a systematic review and a meta-analysis.

          Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. Systemic inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. A study was undertaken to determine whether systemic inflammation is present in stable COPD. A systematic review was conducted of studies which reported on the relationship between COPD, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) or forced vital capacity (FVC), and levels of various systemic inflammatory markers: C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, leucocytes, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukins 6 and 8. Where possible the results were pooled together to produce a summary estimate using a random or fixed effects model. Fourteen original studies were identified. Overall, the standardised mean difference in the CRP level between COPD and control subjects was 0.53 units (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34 to 0.72). The standardised mean difference in the fibrinogen level was 0.47 units (95% CI 0.29 to 0.65). Circulating leucocytes were also higher in COPD than in control subjects (standardised mean difference 0.44 units (95% CI 0.20 to 0.67)), as were serum TNF-alpha levels (standardised mean difference 0.59 units (95% CI 0.29 to 0.89)). Reduced lung function is associated with increased levels of systemic inflammatory markers which may have important pathophysiological and therapeutic implications for subjects with stable COPD.
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            Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

            This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) 50% predicted. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 7: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians should prescribe continuous oxygen therapy in patients with COPD who have severe resting hypoxemia (Pao(2) ≤55 mm Hg or Spo(2) ≤88%) (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).
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              From COPD to chronic systemic inflammatory syndrome?

               L. Fabbri,  K. F. Rabe (2007)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2016
                06 January 2016
                : 11
                : 81-90
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Airways Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK
                [2 ]Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
                [3 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany
                [4 ]Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Medical Director, LungenClinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Centre North, German Centre for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Jadwiga A Wedzicha, Respiratory Medicine, Airways Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Guy Scadding Building, Dovehouse Street, London SW3 6LY, UK, Tel +44 20 7594 7947, Email j.wedzicha@ 123456imperial.ac.uk
                Article
                copd-11-081
                10.2147/COPD.S89849
                4708192
                © 2016 Wedzicha et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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