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      A Novel Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase 10A in Pathological Cardiac Remodeling and Dysfunction

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          Abstract

          Background:

          Heart failure is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), through degradation of cyclic nucleotides, play critical roles in cardiovascular biology and disease. Our preliminary screening studies have revealed PDE10A upregulation in the diseased heart. However, the roles of PDE10A in cardiovascular biology and disease are largely uncharacterized. The current study is aimed to investigate the regulation and function of PDE10A in cardiac cells and in the progression of cardiac remodeling and dysfunction.

          Methods:

          We used isolated adult mouse cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts, as well as preclinical mouse models of hypertrophy and heart failure. The PDE10A selective inhibitor TP-10, and global PDE10A knock out mice were used.

          Results:

          We found that PDE10A expression remains relatively low in normal and exercised heart tissues. However, PDE10A is significantly upregulated in mouse and human failing hearts. In vitro, PDE10A deficiency or inhibiting PDE10A with selective inhibitor TP-10, attenuated cardiac myocyte pathological hypertrophy induced by Angiotensin II, phenylephrine, and isoproterenol, but did not affect cardiac myocyte physiological hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1). TP-10 also reduced TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β)–stimulated cardiac fibroblast activation, proliferation, migration and extracellular matrix synthesis. TP-10 treatment elevated both cAMP and cGMP levels in cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, consistent with PDE10A as a cAMP/cGMP dual-specific PDE. In vivo, global PDE10A deficiency significantly attenuated myocardial hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and dysfunction induced by chronic pressure overload via transverse aorta constriction or chronic neurohormonal stimulation via Angiotensin II infusion. Importantly, we demonstrated that the pharmacological effect of TP-10 is specifically through PDE10A inhibition. In addition, TP-10 is able to reverse pre-established cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. RNA-Sequencing and bioinformatics analysis further identified a PDE10A-regualted transcriptome involved in cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and cardiomyopathy.

          Conclusions:

          Taken together, our study elucidates a novel role for PDE10A in the regulation of pathological cardiac remodeling and development of heart failure. Given that PDE10A has been proven to be a safe drug target, PDE10A inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating cardiac diseases associated with cardiac remodeling.

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          Most cited references 38

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          Cardiac plasticity.

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            Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

            Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants.
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              The extracellular matrix in myocardial injury, repair, and remodeling.

               Nikolaos G Frangogiannis (corresponding) (2017)
              The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides mechanical support, but also transduces essential molecular signals in health and disease. Following myocardial infarction, dynamic ECM changes drive inflammation and repair. Early generation of bioactive matrix fragments activates proinflammatory signaling. The formation of a highly plastic provisional matrix facilitates leukocyte infiltration and activates infarct myofibroblasts. Deposition of matricellular proteins modulates growth factor signaling and contributes to the spatial and temporal regulation of the reparative response. Mechanical stress due to pressure and volume overload and metabolic dysfunction also induce profound changes in ECM composition that contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. This manuscript reviews the role of the ECM in cardiac repair and remodeling and discusses matrix-based therapies that may attenuate remodeling while promoting repair and regeneration.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Circulation
                Circulation
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0009-7322
                1524-4539
                January 21 2020
                January 21 2020
                : 141
                : 3
                : 217-233
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine (S.C., Y.Z., J.K.L., D.M.M., J.W., P.Y., E.M.S., C.Y.), University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY.
                [2 ]Department of Pharmacology and Physiology (S.C.), University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY.
                [3 ]Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (P.Y.), University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY.
                Article
                10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.042178
                7147986
                31801360
                © 2020

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