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      Organization and function of the 3D genome

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      Nature Reviews Genetics

      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          Understanding how chromatin is organized within the nucleus and how this 3D architecture influences gene regulation, cell fate decisions and evolution are major questions in cell biology. Despite spectacular progress in this field, we still know remarkably little about the mechanisms underlying chromatin structure and how it can be established, reset and maintained. In this Review, we discuss the insights into chromatin architecture that have been gained through recent technological developments in quantitative biology, genomics and cell and molecular biology approaches and explain how these new concepts have been used to address important biological questions in development and disease.

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          Most cited references 73

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          A map of the cis-regulatory sequences in the mouse genome.

          The laboratory mouse is the most widely used mammalian model organism in biomedical research. The 2.6 × 10(9) bases of the mouse genome possess a high degree of conservation with the human genome, so a thorough annotation of the mouse genome will be of significant value to understanding the function of the human genome. So far, most of the functional sequences in the mouse genome have yet to be found, and the cis-regulatory sequences in particular are still poorly annotated. Comparative genomics has been a powerful tool for the discovery of these sequences, but on its own it cannot resolve their temporal and spatial functions. Recently, ChIP-Seq has been developed to identify cis-regulatory elements in the genomes of several organisms including humans, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we apply the same experimental approach to a diverse set of 19 tissues and cell types in the mouse to produce a map of nearly 300,000 murine cis-regulatory sequences. The annotated sequences add up to 11% of the mouse genome, and include more than 70% of conserved non-coding sequences. We define tissue-specific enhancers and identify potential transcription factors regulating gene expression in each tissue or cell type. Finally, we show that much of the mouse genome is organized into domains of coordinately regulated enhancers and promoters. Our results provide a resource for the annotation of functional elements in the mammalian genome and for the study of mechanisms regulating tissue-specific gene expression.
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            Architectural protein subclasses shape 3D organization of genomes during lineage commitment.

            Understanding the topological configurations of chromatin may reveal valuable insights into how the genome and epigenome act in concert to control cell fate during development. Here, we generate high-resolution architecture maps across seven genomic loci in embryonic stem cells and neural progenitor cells. We observe a hierarchy of 3D interactions that undergo marked reorganization at the submegabase scale during differentiation. Distinct combinations of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), Mediator, and cohesin show widespread enrichment in chromatin interactions at different length scales. CTCF/cohesin anchor long-range constitutive interactions that might form the topological basis for invariant subdomains. Conversely, Mediator/cohesin bridge short-range enhancer-promoter interactions within and between larger subdomains. Knockdown of Smc1 or Med12 in embryonic stem cells results in disruption of spatial architecture and downregulation of genes found in cohesin-mediated interactions. We conclude that cell-type-specific chromatin organization occurs at the submegabase scale and that architectural proteins shape the genome in hierarchical length scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              The Xist lncRNA exploits three-dimensional genome architecture to spread across the X chromosome.

              Many large noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate chromatin, but the mechanisms by which they localize to genomic targets remain unexplored. We investigated the localization mechanisms of the Xist lncRNA during X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), a paradigm of lncRNA-mediated chromatin regulation. During the maintenance of XCI, Xist binds broadly across the X chromosome. During initiation of XCI, Xist initially transfers to distal regions across the X chromosome that are not defined by specific sequences. Instead, Xist identifies these regions by exploiting the three-dimensional conformation of the X chromosome. Xist requires its silencing domain to spread across actively transcribed regions and thereby access the entire chromosome. These findings suggest a model in which Xist coats the X chromosome by searching in three dimensions, modifying chromosome structure, and spreading to newly accessible locations.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Genetics
                Nat Rev Genet
                Springer Nature
                1471-0056
                1471-0064
                November 2016
                November 1 2016
                : 17
                : 11
                : 661-678
                Article
                10.1038/nrg.2016.112
                27739532
                © 2016

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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