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      A Physical Layer Secured Key Distribution Technique for IEEE 802.11g Wireless Networks

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          Abstract

          Key distribution and renewing in wireless local area networks is a crucial issue to guarantee that unauthorized users are prevented from accessing the network. In this paper, we propose a technique for allowing an automatic bootstrap and periodic renewing of the network key by exploiting physical layer security principles, that is, the inherent differences among transmission channels. The proposed technique is based on scrambling of groups of consecutive packets and does not need the use of an initial authentication nor automatic repeat request protocols. We present a modification of the scrambling circuits included in the IEEE 802.11g standard which allows for a suitable error propagation at the unauthorized receiver, thus achieving physical layer security.

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          914 MHz path loss prediction models for indoor wireless communications in multifloored buildings

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            Coding with Scrambling, Concatenation, and HARQ for the AWGN Wire-Tap Channel: A Security Gap Analysis

            This study examines the use of nonsystematic channel codes to obtain secure transmissions over the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) wire-tap channel. Unlike the previous approaches, we propose to implement nonsystematic coded transmission by scrambling the information bits, and characterize the bit error rate of scrambled transmissions through theoretical arguments and numerical simulations. We have focused on some examples of Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) and low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes to estimate the security gap, which we have used as a measure of physical layer security, in addition to the bit error rate. Based on a number of numerical examples, we found that such a transmission technique can outperform alternative solutions. In fact, when an eavesdropper (Eve) has a worse channel than the authorized user (Bob), the security gap required to reach a given level of security is very small. The amount of degradation of Eve's channel with respect to Bob's that is needed to achieve sufficient security can be further reduced by implementing scrambling and descrambling operations on blocks of frames, rather than on single frames. While Eve's channel has a quality equal to or better than that of Bob's channel, we have shown that the use of a hybrid automatic repeat-request (HARQ) protocol with authentication still allows achieving a sufficient level of security. Finally, the secrecy performance of some practical schemes has also been measured in terms of the equivocation rate about the message at the eavesdropper and compared with that of ideal codes.
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              1212.4991

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