27
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      On the Use of Beta Coefficients in Meta-Analysis.

      ,
      Journal of Applied Psychology
      American Psychological Association (APA)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This research reports an investigation of the use of standardized regression (beta) coefficients in meta-analyses that use correlation coefficients as the effect-size metric. The investigation consisted of analyzing more than 1,700 corresponding beta coefficients and correlation coefficients harvested from published studies. Results indicate that, under certain conditions, using knowledge of corresponding beta coefficients to input missing correlations (effect sizes) generally produces relatively accurate and precise population effect-size estimates. Potential benefits from applying this knowledge include smaller sampling errors because of increased numbers of effect sizes and smaller non-sampling errors because of the inclusion of a broader array of research designs.

          Related collections

          Most cited references18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The file drawer problem and tolerance for null results.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Perceived organizational support: A review of the literature.

            The authors reviewed more than 70 studies concerning employees' general belief that their work organization values their contribution and cares about their well-being (perceived organizational support; POS). A meta-analysis indicated that 3 major categories of beneficial treatment received by employees (i.e., fairness, supervisor support, and organizational rewards and favorable job conditions) were associated with POS. POS, in turn, was related to outcomes favorable to employees (e.g., job satisfaction, positive mood) and the organization (e.g., affective commitment, performance, and lessened withdrawal behavior). These relationships depended on processes assumed by organizational support theory: employees' belief that the organization's actions were discretionary, feeling of obligation to aid the organization, fulfillment of socioemotional needs, and performance-reward expectancies.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              A Fail-Safe N for Effect Size in Meta-Analysis

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Psychology
                Journal of Applied Psychology
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1939-1854
                0021-9010
                2005
                2005
                : 90
                : 1
                : 175-181
                Article
                10.1037/0021-9010.90.1.175
                15641898
                060282ab-bbbd-43cc-b28a-49fa418d3749
                © 2005
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article